Exclusive interview with Michael Kahn - Aotg.com

underappreciated in the industry), where two editors Jonny and James talk ...... to test the experience, so Wayne s solution was to push himself close to a big ...
21MB taille 3 téléchargements 498 vues
Fall 2014

Exclusive interview with Michael Kahn Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness

ACE Cannes Highlights

The Hidden Universe

The Process of Transformative Television

Inside Hemlock Grove

les murs

Contents

Contents

3 Fall Intro

4

Mrs. Biggs

31

Teaching Editing In A Post-Classroom World

6

The Hidden Universe

34

The Psychology of the Cutting Room

9

Inside Hemlock Grove: The Process of

Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness

13

The Ascension of Community

17

Cutting Commercials

20

ACE Cannes Highlights

24

facebook.com/aotgnetwork

Rhythm and Our Lives

28

twitter.com/artguillotine

Transformative Television

36

list of ADVERTISERS Shutterstock Blackmagic Design Sony Creative Software LAPPG MEW Moviola

39

Le secret de Juliane Lorenz

46

www.aotg.com [email protected]

youtube.com/Aotgdotcom

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

Letter from the editor

Fall Intro

sionate people. Everyone on the team would agree, that doing a monthly magazine is desirable but unachievable with our current size. Don’t fret though. We are working closely with our writers, coders, and sponsors to move from a biannual to a bimonthly publication, with the eventual goal of a monthly digital version. version (Although, not as interactive, still great content).

-

-

net has, in many areas, created a beautiful echo chamber for us, where we are re-assured of our beliefs and ideas. The more I looked at the line up of articles, the more I thought about our cognitive comfort zone, and the idea of breaking out of how we think on a daily basis. In this issue we move the discussion to a place that might be novel to some. We look at commercial editing (an area I would argue is underappreciated in the industry), where two editors Jonny and James talk about the challenges of story telling in 30 seconds. Then we reevaluate how the education system teaches editing with Norman Hollyn. Why, in this age of interactivity do so many post-secondary institutions still use the 3 hour lecture structure? We want you to reconsider the elements of the post world you know, and hope this issue will ignite your comfort zone with a new

Sincerely, Gordon Burkell

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

4

Assembly

Teaching Editing In A Post-Classroom World

Teaching Editing In A Post-Classroom World Article Author Norman Hollyn

I tell people that, in addition to editing, I teach editing at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. There are many answers to

Location Los Angeles, USA

There are a lot of reasons why many people should go to

www IMDb

several talks and a webinar A vision that many people have is of students looking up at a teacher who is showing them how to get proper

USC

sures, lens sizes and lighting.

-

the editing software. What does an editing class look like today? To answer that, let’s talk about what an editing room looks like today. Gone are the days when editors were responsible for crafting a story solely by creating relationships between shots. Now we tell our stories by using and Art Gugliemo have a great conversation about this on a recent episode of “That Post Show But just teaching the tools isn’t enough. Those tools are constantly changing, so the aotg.com

twitter

facebook

6

Assembly

Teaching Editing In A Post-Classroom World

edited an action or a comedy scene and they see that it’s not as dynamic or funny as they would like. What this means is that all editing classes need to be project-oriented classes, even when we are talking about editing history. The amount of learning that students can get

to teach its students how to learn the latest tools on their own. -

learned and come up short. They need that failure to help them to really learn.

ing part-time at USC I had a few students come from the School of Anthropology who

where students edit a set of supplied dailies, from a supplied script, and then screen their

of our cinema students took Anthropology

them to come up with a story for the footage, and then to edit it to tell that story. I then tell the other half of the class to avoid story at all costs. Some of them edit it by organizing the images by color. Others match screen direction or create split screens with seemingly ran-

bubble. longer be the case. Our students are taking classes in neuroscience, engineering, and sociology. They are taking classes in the health sciences, and programming apps with engineers. There is no more bubble. There can’t be.

cuts that were created with a story actually have a story. On the other hand, the cuts that were created to avoid a story still have a story. We learn that the human mind insists on oring images in our own ways. -

own stories or attempt to create something

thinking about how media crosses all boundaries, then you might as well join those unemdon’t have to be in a classroom at all.

-

search, as well as craft building. Other ways of doing the same thing are to instruct students to take a dramatic scene and edit it for comedy, or to take a scary scene and turn it into something sweet (watch the happy trailer for The Shining here). Note that at no point have I said that

-

classes, Google Hangouts, and informal meetings. Editing happens during class time, along and age group, but no learning can happen without all three components. At its core, this comes from the reality that creative students learn best when they

color correct. However, if you create the that they need to composite shots together

have been tussling with their editing process, not before they start editing. Analogously, the value of my knowledge as a teacher of editing comes after they have

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

7

Assembly

Teaching Editing In A Post-Classroom World

Our students rarely learn a tool without the need to use it. These tools don’t need to always be at the high end. I have created assignments using the online editing tools Popcorn and Zeega, programs that are far inferior to the NLEs that we edit with every day. I think that it is better to have students use a variety of tools, rather than only one.

television in which the creators control the order in which the viewer takes in information.

-

8 Tahrir , a crowd-sourced music video from all over the world, and an architectural building projection installation

give them. Film education should prepare students for the broadening media landscape

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

The Psychology of the Cutting Room

appeared on 30 Rock, playing Ritchie, the editor for Liz Lemon’s show TGS. Giamatti’s a hockey jersey to work and takes his frustrations out on producers and directors. Although in cheek look at our profession. I’m not bringing this up to raise trouble with 30 Rock. It’s a funny and light-hearted representation that played a role in propelling the story in the episode. It is this representaNeedless to say, there are not that many psychologists studying the elusive editor. My journey of discovery took me to the University of Toronto’s Psychology Department. Talking -

tional behaviour. His research focuses on ways people can utilize the knowledge of how they behave in particular scenarios to help them in the business world.

The Psychology of the Cutting Room Interview Interview with Written by Gordon Burkell Location Toronto, Canada G. Leonardelli’s Webpage G. Leonardelli’s Twitter

tense discussion that can turn into debates and can easily devolve into arguments. A place where directors, who have poured their heart and soul into a project, only come to the realization that the project they dreamed of isn’t working. A place where editors and directors defend their vision against the cold hands of the studios, broadcasters, or distributors. Many times, the editing room can become a pseudoand discussing issues from the set, all of which stay within the walls of that sacred room. Yet, there is a perceived image of what an editor is. Not in terms of what we do, but in terms of who we are as a collective group. When an editor appears as a character in -

aotg.com

-

ing into, and this is what has helped lead to the areas we’ll focus on in this article.

9

“In-group vs Out-group” Our primary area of focus is in-group vs out-group. In-group and out-group can be underdamentally, this resides in the idea of us versus them, or for the cultural theory purveyors, production team, not the production or pre-production team. Within that area, we are the

from the other editors in the industry through union vs non-union and within the unions in a pay tier system.

twitter

facebook

Assembly

The Psychology of the Cutting Room

many instances there is still a stigma and a separation in certain editing circles. When talking to Adam Epstein for The Cutting Room Podcast, he mentioned how many see editing commercials as beneath them, or something to look down on. When I was in L.A. recently, meeting he asked if I could not tell anyone that he’s been cutting commercials because of how it might look. This outlook on the commercial editing still prevails, despite the fact that post companies.

-

the issues of NLE software categorization. by those traits. Many editors in the industry get frustrated when they are pigeonholed into a particular area of editing. More still get upset when job postings look for an editor based

10

for comfort that comes from interconnections and knowledge that we are a part of a group.

Psychology is the study of mental functions and behaviours.

tools because that’s their point of connection, that’s their in-group. They can’t connect on selves. We need to begin talking about story structure, character development, and how we mold the story in the editing room, not the technological tools that aid us in the process. -

dian Cinema Editors, American Cinema Editors, Les Monteurs, Australian Screen Editors,

rytellers and artists. They’ve held talks with editors from around the world, put out articles -

frey pointed out in the interview, an editor’s work, in many instances, is not meant to be obvious. “The work itself is intended to be more seamless, rather than more noticeable… don’t dress professionally, at least not as editors once did, with dress shirts, pants, and a when arguing a point or attempting to be seen as an authority on a subject. Whether we Other ideas of editors self-stereotyping include editors being seen as loners, working If we are to get past our issues of identity and allow ourselves to be more authoritative on story, we also need to be more publicly present to the world. Groups like The Cana-

aotg.com

someone who handles the technology, then we are merely the button pushers, if they see the editor as an artist crafting the story, then that is what they will encourage in the cutting process. of people, each a part of an autonomous group within the larger project, congregating over

twitter

facebook

Assembly

The Psychology of the Cutting Room

-

celebrity, who is producing or a famous director? How does one deal with this pressure and

amalgamated for one brief period and then dispersed. When the project is complete, the against one another to secure work. Yet, they are thrust together for small bursts of time and must work in collaboration for the common good of a project. “That’s what I think makes your industry so interesting. It’s that it’s this project-based domain, right? You pull people together to do a project, and then it’s disbanded, once the job is done. This is where I think networks play such an important role, because it’s [about] who you know and making a positive impression, so that it can carry forward. But I also think that’s where the categories in which you belong are helpful, so editors who have multiple

role in the production and post production process. In many instances, Tronick found himself with two major stars behind him on the couch watching his work (listen to Michael Tronick discuss this in The Cutting Room Podcast “That, I think, speaks to what purpose you’re [the editor] there to do... I guess there editor as one of almost an advisory capacity. It’s like, ‘Here are the implications of what I’m here’s what I would recommend.’ What I’m suggesting is that you keep coming back to what objective you think the producers and directors are seeking… they have all other objectives, about budget, about the reputation of their stars, about a directorial style. All of these things, I think, could be It was an interesting discussion about the possibilities of the cutting room relationand perceived. There are many dichotomies at work: the desire to lead and control the cutof the philosophical editor or that of a slacker. We are in control of these, and yet we allow we need to get a hold of our image and how we are perceived. We need to control the message.

It is important to note that Psychology is a complex subject matter and this article merely scratches the surface. If readers are interested and want more on this subject, we can conduct more research and do follow up articles. Please let us know via Twitter, Facebook, or Email. aotg.com

twitter

facebook

11

Assembly

Close Encounters with Michael Kahn, Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness

Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness Close Encounters with Michael Kahn

Interview Interview with Michael Kahn Written by Bobbie O’Steen

13

Photos & Videos Manhattan Edit Workshop Location NYC, USA Bobbie O’Steen’s Website Michael Kahn’s IMDb MEWshop Website Lincoln Saving Private Ryan Jurassic Park Raiders of the Lost Ark Close Encounters of The Third Kind

Michael Kahn is a record breaker, with the most combined Oscar nominations and wins for editing. He’s also had the longest collaboration on the most films with any single director, that being Steven Spielberg, having worked together on 22 films in 38 years. What’s impressive is not just the quality and diversity of those films, but the way Spielberg speaks so movingly and appreciatively about Kahn, “A man who is like a brother I never had and someone who is a gourmet in the editing room and the keeper of my kitchen.” Despite all the accolades and praise, Kahn does not understand what the fuss is all about. He has also never been the sole focus of an event, probably due mostly to his modesty. I approached Kahn about doing a one-on-one panel this past June, part of an all-day editing celebration called “Sight, Sound & Story,” produced by Manhattan Edit Workshop. He emailed me the following response: “Thank you so much for the invite but should I accept, don’t expect miracles.” As it turned out, our event was kind of miraculous. The film clips we screened represented a dazzling display of his accomplishments, and he was both wise and witty as he shared what he’s learned from 49 years of editing.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

Close Encounters with Michael Kahn, Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness

Get as much experience as possible roes. The directors shot a lot of footage and he had to constantly adjust to different styles

After Hogan’s Heroes, Kahn worked with such directors as George C. Scott and Irvin Kerch-

14

The importance of listening take notes when they viewed dailies together, so Kahn could observe him. “I would watch -

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

Close Encounters with Michael Kahn, Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness

Don’t worry about length Kahn said Spielberg never wanted to know how long the cause you know if you think the show is too long, you may

start ‘Hey let’s trim a little here or there’ and we never had

Immersing himself in the moment had another advantage,

Don’t worry about being wrong

still editing Jurassic Park, because there was so much CGI to wait for, while they were shooting the emotionally dev-

On Close Encounters of the Third Kind, there’s a scene where Neary (Richard Dreyfess) is running over the hill to get away from the helicopters. “I had so much coverage, I didn’t know which way to go. I went over to Steven, ‘Can you help me put this scene together? I don’t know what I’m doing.’ He said, ‘I think that’s wonderful that you’re straight that

One cut at a time

We screened the iconic cave scene from Raiders of the Lost Ark. “Everyone thinks it’s the ball rolling, but the most difit and nobody ever mentioned it. You’ve got to do things like that to get some suspense. If you let the door close, he’s

frames per second, then doubled up to 24. “We almost Kahn clearly does not get overwhelmed. “The most challenging thing that I do is put two cuts together, that’s the most important thing I’m doing at the moment. I don’t think ahead, I don’t think behind. Every cut is dependent upon knowledge, I work from feel. It’s the same way with Steven,

Zen mind, beginners mind Kahn learned early on, after reading a book of that title, that If you can come in clean, and start afresh, “you’re willing to

aotg.com

Be willing to break rules

twitter

facebook

15 They knew the audience wanted to buy ‘movie time’ for ment of those cuts.

-

Don’t rush it – and no coitus interruptus A contrast in Kahn’s approach came up when we screened of thing, where you rush and you go fast because that’s a style. We deliberately wanted to go slow, make it real. And

meeting with his cabinet, which ran over seven minutes long with hardly any cuts. “The best thing you can do in a lot of cases is not to cut. It takes a lot of courage, because the Kahn said that he and Spielberg resisted the urge to cut

Assembly

Close Encounters with Michael Kahn, Spielberg’s Flashlight in the Darkness

more than ever on Lincoln, because “the point is when that happens without cutting, you’re listening better.” This was especially effective in order to fully experience Daniel Day Lewis’ brilliant acting and the dense dialog of that period. The issue also came up on other films. “Don’t break into a performance, you’re going to break into the feeling, everything the actor’s putting into it…We would say: ‘No coitus interruptus!’”

Disorientation and theory of threes “We like to start with what we call disorientation – a close shot where you don’t know where you are, then eventually come back to the master so that gives the audience two bumps. It refreshes them, pulls them into the scene” “If somebody’s talking, we don’t go to one reaction or two, we go to three. We found out that is the best way to go.”

Take chances He said with Spielberg he “sometimes changed things around because now he had a choice to see it another way.”

“Don’t be afraid to be wrong” At least you’re smoking the director out to what he likes and doesn’t like. Because if you don’t have the courage to do something different and be wrong then the scene will never grow, the show will never grow… You’re not just a pair of hands and it’s a very, very important job if you make yourself really worthwhile to the director. He has to understand that you’re testing him, that you’re giving him something special. Editing is a testing tool. The director may hate what you’ve done, but what the heck, you tried!”

My advice: Don’t be afraid to embarrass your honoree with some well-deserved flattery I quoted Spielberg when he presented Kahn with A.C.E.’s Career Achievement award in 2011: “Since 1976 we have inhabited the same brain. On a really tough production Michael constantly renews my faith that the best solutions are right around the corner – and he’s never been wrong…In the 35 years that we’ve been partners, Mike has never lost his appetite to see a movie through the eyes of the people for whom it was intended. Michael is my flashlight in the darkness…He’s probably embarrassed hearing me talk about it right now, but he’s as much an artist as Frank Gehry is an architect.” Kahn is the 30th editor I’ve interviewed for a public event and probably the most reluctant. In the past, many were pleasantly surprised that the audience cared so much about what they had to say. Was Michael one of them? I think so. He did, after all, get a standing ovation. Photos Courtesy of Manhattan Edit Workshop, From Sight, Sound & Story June 14, 2014.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

16

Assembly

The Ascension of Community

The Ascension of Community

Group Interview Interview by Gordon Burkell Location Boston, LA, and San Francisco USA SF CUTTERS

It isn’t merely a user group, a SuperMeet, or a post group and it’s not about FCP, Avid, Adobe, or any other NLE out there. It’s about community. Every week, I am asked by a young person how to break into the industry, or what software do they need missed something vital. Don’t get me wrong, knowl-

LACPUG BOSCPUG LAPPG

into the industry. What is that thing? Being sociable. project through colleagues. Don’t get me wrong, reputs your name forward, you need these items to ensure you secure that project. However, you won’t be recommended if you haven’t done the ground work and built those relationships.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

17

Assembly

The Ascension of Community

That’s why groups such as LACPUG, BOSCPUG, SF CUTTERS, LAPPG and many others around the world are so vital to the editing and post-production communities. They help us forge new relationships and keep the

What is fascinating, is that both SF CUTTERS and LACPUG reference 2-pop communities and Lawrence Jordan (not to be confused with Larry

share knowledge in an industry where we are often found in the dark rooms behind glowing monitors.

LACPUG: The Los Angeles Final Cut Pro User Group, (LAFCPUG) was born out of the 2-pop community, a web site and online discussion forum(s) created by editor Lawrence Jordan. Established in June of 2000 by a few dozen folks who had been meeting regularly on the forums for about a year, the LAFCPUG was created simply for a chance to meet NLE, Final Cut Pro. SF CUTTERS: I was an early adopter of Final Cut Pro

There are user groups around the world from Calgary, Canada (Calgary Fabulous Creative Pro User Group) to Hong Kong (Hong Kong Creative create larger gatherings such as the SouthEast Creative Summit put on by the Atlanta Cutters, while others have taken to the web and built user group forums for ongoing discussions. But, what about the early groups? What about the SuperMeets? How did it all start out?

and very enthusiastic about the potential of Final Cut Pro. In the San Francisco Bay Area, I had heard of software user groups, but never one cen-

We sat down with four groups, LACPUG, BOSCPUG, SF CUTTERS and LAPPG to learn more about the early days of the user groups we’ve come to know and love and how things have changed with the advent of technology and the creation of new user groups.

put those two ideas together. I had no idea at that time that this idea would eventually be the foundation for a worldwide movement.

: Back in 2001, the birth of the BOSCPUG (prorepeatedly asked to me: “Where can we get more on Final Cut? Then, I was presenting FCP-related seminars at the old Boston Apple Market Center near Fanueil Hall. The seminars helped, but people just wanted more, they like-minded people together in Boston, but how? LACPUG: Woody [Woodhall, CAS] had been conductthat time in 2008. We hosted several of these at our post-production facility, Allied Post, in Santa Monica, CA. Also, with the rapid changes in post and their projects. Los Angeles Post Production Group came out of that and

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

18

Assembly

The Ascension of Community

and motion graphics. The change was to bring more people to the community for engagefor years already, just now the names of the usergroups matched the community. SF CUTTERS and LAPPG both didn’t specify in their names an NLE and so there was no need to change their names.

LACPUG: There have been dozens of memorable moments over our 14

And all in their way, were memorable. This group has been there to witness every advance in technology, witness every new piece of software and hardware, seen companies come and go and software and hardware evolve. We have been there through the highs of the digital revolution and the lows of the economy. We have seen success and failure and abso-

Many things have changed in the last 15 years. That doesn’t even take into account the technological advances. So what does the future hold for the user group? It always goes back to that core fundamental idea. Community. And I think Wendy from LAPPG sums it up perfectly: “One of the key things for these communities is the sharing of knowledge and this is

LAPPG: most recently when we hosted a special LAPPG LA along with NewFilmmakers Los Angeles and FilmLA it was wonderful seeing the turnout

believe very strongly in the power of meeting face to face. The future of communities

19

was also special presenting an award of recognition on behalf of Los Angeles to Blumhouse Productions (The Purge, Insidious, Sinister, Paranormal Activity, etc.) for keeping 95% of SF CUTTERS: The most memorable moment was when Sharon Franklin managed to get Walter Murch to speak at SF CUTTERS at Ft. Mason Center in September of 2004. (Walter’s talk at SF CUTTERS predates any appearance at SuperMeets and other FCPUGS).

: Things in this industry are constantly evolving and because of BOSCPUG and LAFC-

PUG and the Los Angeles Creative Pro User Group. Despite what many thought, this change

needed to know multiple NLE’S and not just that, they also needed to know color correction aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

Cutting Commercials

James Rosen is a sought-after commercials editor working at boutique editing house Final Cut, in the heart of London. James and I sat down for a long conversation about how a commercial comes together and his own journey from starting as a runner through to being a senior editor.

Cutting Commercials

Interview Interview with James Rosen Interviewed by Jonny Elwyn Location London, UK

30 or 40 seconds are most common, 60 is long and usually the full length version, 90’s are epic.

Jonny Elwyn’s Website

20 The longest version needed will be the one you usually start with. Sometimes it depends on what needs to be

ent a shorter length before anything else because that’s the one that gets played the most. However, the longest cut is the one you almost always start with, because it will usually contain everything that needs to be approved in all versions. Recently I cut a lovely 30 second Sainsbury’s ad and they also needed a 60 for YouTube. The director had shot it for taining everything the director had shot, all the ideas that were covered, and we went from there. to the 30, which meant instantly dropping a lot of scenes.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

Cutting Commercials

I got the 30 to length, and then went back to the parked longer version. Editing a shorter version gives you really lose things. You start to understand what’s really needed going backwards and forwards between the lengths can be very educational. Do you just get handed the footage with the freedom to

ferred process that I like, which is time alone to organize the project and get everything the way I like it. Make some selects of my own. Get the director in and watch through the selects together.

ally value objectivity. If they have watched how it’s come in watching the rough cut. It’s a shame because you get one chance at that pure objectivity and then you end up watching it again and again and again. You can get kind of blind to things. Things get very familiar. One of the hardest things about this job is overfamiliarity. My eyes develop muscle memory and I start

screen to what you’re used to. I think the more the objectivity can be protected and remain in the process, the better.

takes, compositions, performances, etc. We talk about cuss the ideas we are trying to communicate and the way they, as directors, want to communicate them. Then I have some time again on my own to have a go at happy to have people sit with me, and some directors like want it to go together, but that process always happens in the end anyway. I often like to try and assemble something on my own and bring them back in for a really honest reaction to their own work. Agencies like to see things very early nowadays, due to cuts, and the only reason I don’t like that is because I re-

able aspects of the job for me, being part of creative discussions and disagreements. I love getting to the heart of what makes things work. What made you want to get into editing and how did you

more organized you are, the more use you’re going to be with whatever challenges they decide to throw at you. This is where time is well spent in the initial stages of the edit. Secondly, when disagreements come up, I try and focus say? Then, it usually becomes clear if the disagreement is based on personal preference or something more funda-

I went to art school, took lots of post-production classes and found myself happily staying through the night to get something done. Just absolutely loved it. Later I did a video production post-graduate diploma. Worked on proper NLE’s and digital editing and digital sound design. I graduated and through researching the industry I knew I had to start as a runner, so I worked at various companies as a runner for a year in London, felt like I was enalso very interested in.

try out people’s ideas and see if they work any better than others. Believe it or not, it’s one of the more enjoyaotg.com

twitter

facebook

as a runner and I thought, “Yeah, actually editing was al-

21

Assembly

Cutting Commercials

footage, organized someone’s project for them and then you come back in 3-4 days later and there is a cut. And

for nearly 15 years. Worked up from a runner through learning, but my real training began at Final Cut.

As a runner, the more you put into a job, the more you get out of it. So, again, if you want to be an editor you’ll natuthat? How did you do this bit? Why did you choose that?

We use Avid Media Composer. A few of the editors use Final Cut Pro, but our main system is Avid.

You need to have a plan and know where you want to go. I knew I wanted to be a commercials editor and I

Due to that, I was able to really learn a lot. As an assistant editor you go from being a trainee assistant editor all the way to a senior assistant editor and then a cutting assistant.

-

learn the software and the technical side. Looking back, that was the easy part. Until you have real footage to work with, you’re never going to learn how to cut real projects. At Final Cut I had aclearn editing. Plus, everyone there was very helpful, very supportive.

easier. Eventually, I got promoted and I became an assistant editor and was assigned to look after two or three editors. Then your remit opens up, you’re loading footage, working through the whole production and that’s when your learning really accelerates. You start to get an insight into the creative process, because you’ve loaded the raw

Cutting assistants are placed in a position where they’re doing changes, they’re working on the approval stages directly with clients, maybe if the projects over run and the original editors are now on another job, you are the start. I started doing changes for music videos, which were I did were a few changes for Robbie Williams’ Rock DJ, which one of my editors had cut. I had to replace an arse By then you’re learning something else, which is how to work with clients, and you’re educated all over again. free falling for most of that session, but you get through it. And then maybe the editor will come in on those early assignments and will support you and see what you’re means to be an editor without being the actual editor for

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

the project. It’s just about the best training you could ask for. over projects, edit alternate versions and just keep going with it. And then you’re moved on from assisting to being a junior editor. moment in time where you’re doing one thing and then doing another. But there’s a moment where you’re ofcially doing it, if you know what I mean. European versions on a big PlayStation job, I was given the chance to work on a Christina Aguilera video, which was an unbelievable opportunity for me, as I was still assisting at the time, and the editor I was working for

22

Assembly

Cutting Commercials

became unavailable. So I had to carry on working with That was a big deep-end moment for me. Slowly I was able to prove myself as a capable editor and then the company put their faith in me and moved me into a position where I was no longer assisting. Alongside that, right from the beginning, you’ve always got your own career in mind, so I was also taking on my own projects, in my own time. Music videos are very common, a lot of opportunities, but you’re not paid that thing that I could cut. I was slowly building a portfolio of my own, building contacts, some of whom I still work with today.

most of the commercials production companies also do music videos. into commercials. I did a lot of music videos with him and well together he asked me to edit his commercials. Then my commercials reel began to grow.

I’d like to just be more successful in commercials, really. your toes. In London there seems to be a core set of very crop on the really cool ads. And I want be a part of that set. -

I think it was about 6 years. Running for two years in total. One year at Final Cut. And then assisting for 4-5 years and then I was released from assisting and then basically editing.

work, such as dialogue editing and long form story structure and pace. Those things you cannot learn doing 30sec commercials alone.

23

I recently went to Stockholm to do an Adidas commercial with someone I cut a test commercial for when I was an assistant, well over 10 years ago. They’re now a successful commercials director. Your career can start when you’re a runner, when you’re assisting. When you start in the industry, that’s where you start making those through. So I built up my contacts, built up my reel. I was able to progress in music videos to the point where I was doing foot in the door with commercials. And then through that I was able to get into commercials too. But that was hard. If you’ve only got music videos on your reel, no one is going to hire you for commercials. However, those two worlds are very tightly linked with a lot of commercials being very stylized and music-led and

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

ACE

ACE Cannes Highlights

Article Written by Eric Kench

I was lucky enough to return to the festival this year not only as a member of the press for CinemaEditor Magazine, but in the Short Film Corner.

Eric Kench’s IMDB ACE Website Cannes Site

ACE Website aotg.com

twitter

facebook

fatigue and try to see as much as you can. Not to mentions all the press conferences, red carpet premieres, interview

24

ACE

ACE Cannes Highlights

razor intense performance playing a man with no name, hell bent on revenge. Went to The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby starring Jessica Chastain in the afternoon, followed

14th

Games: Mockingjay After Party at Cap D’ nitely the most lavish party I’ve ever attended, reminded me

15th

Went to an early press screening of Mike Leigh’s Mr. Turner evolution of the creative process. Timothy Spall gives a masterful performance and it was probably the most beauti-

round tables, junkets, after parties, international galas, panel discussions, networking events, market presentations, and lots and lots of waiting in line. With covering the festival Shorts Corner, and live Tweeting the latest news about the number of interviews, attend several press conferences, and somehow make time to write. Here is the blow by blow of my time at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. The highlights:

13th

Arrived in Cannes, settled into my apartment, and picked up my Press and Filmmaker badges from the accreditation and had dinner in old town.

18th

Started the morning with a press screening of Tommy Lee Jones’ masterful performance from a masterful storyteller. And the lessons of John Ford and Howard Hawks are not lost on

group of social outcasts.

ference afterwards and asked Tommy Lee Jones about the

16th

this day riding tanks down the Croisette with Stallone,

Went to see The Salvation by Danish director Kristian Levring. A gritty and taught “B” western about corruption

-

roundtable interview with director Mike Leigh for Mr. Turner. point to discuss his work with him. Later I attended the Director’s Fortnight screening of Catch Me Daddy. An im-

ject of honor killings. Finished the night on the beach at the Plage Macé for the last half of Sergio Leone’s For A Few Dollars More.

17th

Started the day with a press screening of David Michod’s The Rover. Another one of my favorites at the festival. It’s a “the crash” in the Australian outback. Guy Pearce gives a aotg.com

twitter

facebook

25

ACE

ACE Cannes Highlights

Schwarzenegger, and Ford at the helm. Then went to interview Kristian Levring, the director of The Salvation who was an incredibly nice and articulate guy. Ran to a screening of -

Lost River After Party at the Carlton and I had the opportunity to Found out we’re both a big Martin Rev fans.

21st

Started the morning with Michel Hazanavicius’ The Search, the story of a young boy who befriends a UN worker while

19th

Started the day with a screening of The Wonders, a fairy about a young girl and her family of bee keepers. Then saw Bird People which is more literal a title then you’d think. Finished the night with the Critic’

to Snow In Paradise

-

carpet premiere of Jean-Juc Godard’ Goodbye To Language in the Grand Theatre Lumiere which a high

22nd

20th

Attended Asia Argento’s Incompresa which is a wild and campy coming of age story about a little girl living with her self-absorbed, famous parents in 1980’

was a breath of fresh air in its simplicity and depth of humanity. Then I attended the early press screening of Ryan Gosling’s Lost River, but more on that in a bit. I then attended Wim Wender’s new documentary Salt of The Earth, about photographer and world traveler Sebastião Salgado who documented indigenous cultures and world atrocities. est account of Sebastião’s travels and photo subjects so

child star. That night I attended the red carpet premiere of ’s Mommy. A garish and ’s impressive for its bold style, it ultimately wins you over with its emotionally dynamics relationships.

Attended the early press screening of the Dardenne brother’s Two Days, One Night starring Marion Cotillard. A simple

was a second screening of Ryan Gosling’s directorial debut Lost River I honestly really liked it and was impressed by its hypnotic and kinetic style. The story gets a little muddled toward the end but the tone and atmosphere grab you and don’t let go “Cool Waters” for days after

23rd

Attended an early press screening of Sils Maria starring Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart. Screened the short Atrium, at the Shorts Corner to some journalist the festival. Attended the Quentin Tarantino press conference for his closing night presentation of Sergio Leone’s restored Fist Full Of Dollars. Asked him about Leone’s editing style and got the longest response at the press conferChaz Ebert (Roger Ebert’s wife) after the press conference and told her how much Roger’s work meant to me. Such a aotg.com

twitter

facebook

26

ACE

ACE Cannes Highlights

sweet and friendly woman, glad she’s taking up the mantle ic’ The Tribe. A brutal and relentless

out the bloody victor hands down. Ended the night catching the 20th Anniversary screening of Pulp Fiction with Tarantino and cast on the beach.

24th

Attended Bilge Ceylan’s Winter Sleep, which ended up winning the Palme d’Or. A 3 hour and 16 minute meditation about discontented characters discussing their unhappifully rendered in a drab ‹winter of our discontent’ that makes you appreciate the time you have here. Everynoon I attended Les Combattants, the winner of three Director’ about two teens who share a love for the army and survival. I then watched the Closing Night Award Ceremony in the press lounge which included many gasps, hisses, and cheers from my fellow members of the press when certain “ ” winners were announced. Finished the night having a whiskey at David Lynch’s Silencio pop-up club.

25th

Last day of the festival where they play repeat screening of homage Xenia, great style, great characters. Went to Bennett Miller’s Foxcatcher starring Steve Carrell and Channing and hypnotic atmosphere. A sort-of masterpiece that I saw

as the modern day inverse of “There Will Be Blood”. Ended the festival with my last screening in the evening with Ken Loach’s Jimmy’s Hall story about people struggling together, working together, ence at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival.

and a retrospect of Sergio Leone’s western Dollar Trilogy presented by Quentin Tarantino. So I’m happy to say that the western is alive and well at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival.

26th

I took one last stroll down to the Palais and Croisette as they were already dismantling the festival compounds. Said good bye to my lovely renter Karolina, grabbed the bus to

It was another amazing year at the Cannes Film Festival and I want to thank everyone who made it possible and helped me along the way. Thank you to everyone at ACE and Cin’d also like to thank everyone that journalist soldiers. It was great meeting so many new friends

Personal Favorite Films of the Festival: 1. Salt Of The Earth 2. Two Days, One Night 3. The Homesman 4. 5. The Tribe 6. The Rover 7. Lost River 8. The Salvation 9. Mr. Turner 10. Jimmy’s Hall Honorable Mentions: Darker Than Midnight, Goodbye To Language, Incompresa

27

On a side note, this year at the festival there were a number there was The Homesman, a traditional Hollywood western playing in competition, The Salvation, a classic revenge tition, The Rover, a neo-western in the outback, El Ardor, a revenge style western set in the jungles of South America,

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

-

ACE

Rhythm and Our Lives

R

hythm plays a very important part in our lives from the basic physical to the complicated mental level and everything in between. Our heart beats rhythmically and our breathing also has a much deliber-

Rhythm and Our Lives

it is governed by the rhythm of walking, running, or the pedal strokes on our bicycle and even the chewing of our food has a calculated tempo. All our non-rigid technical inventions are based on the repetitive aspects of their nature whether it’s the RPM of the combustion engine or the hertz cycles in electricity. Even as we entertain ourselves, the music and dance moves follow a strict pattern that carries adagio, while the tango, the waltz and the that follow the beat of their melodic measures. When we add language, the string of words is forced into the stroke of the rhythm to form the lyrics of a song and even when the music is absent we recite Article Written by Edgar Burcksen Edgar Burcksen IMDb Edgar Burcksen’s Website ACE Website

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

our poems rhythmically to the beat of the iambic pentameter or the pounding 16bar beat of the rappers. So it is no big editing listens to a variety of pulses that are the backbone of our art. When we talk about the rhythm of each form prints its structure on the editing process. The most basic rhythm in editing is determined by the cut. This is most visible in, for instance, less sophisticated music videos where the cuts follow the downbeat of the music. It also performs prominently in montages where als needs the power of the rhythm to bond them into a deeper meaning than the mere appearance of the visual all by in the images themselves determined by the tempo of the dialogue, the action, or both. The most sophisticated and elusive rhythm lies in the meaning of the string of need to master all of these aspects of editing and then the rhythm upgrades to the level of what is called the pacing of a movie. As an editor you have to think of yourself as a conductor of a big symphony orchestra who wields the baton to speed up or slow down the instrumentalists according to his or her interpretation of the music. The editor has the same

28

ACE

Rhythm and Our Lives

power as the conductor controlling the beats of the cuts, entire movie. In each of these instances the intriguing part is how the editor follows or molds the rhythm. When the editor deals with the simplest of this, the splices that connect visually unrelated images, then he or she has the choice of following a set meter, then abandoning it to make a dramatic statement or totally neglect the notion of rhythm and follow the inner rhythm of the shots themselves as performed by a long montage of wide shots of iconic Parisian landmarks edited to the music of jazz great Sidney Bechet. The cuts follow the beat of the music and if you were not aware of some interesting undertones, you could easily discard the montage as a mediocre promotional job of the French Dewriter Gil (Owen Wilson) and his love for the City of Light, a lot of things begin to click. Like Gil, Sidney Bechet was an Woody Allen, plays the clarinet. Add to that Gil’s encounStein who chaperoned the likes of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald and Cole Porter and you begin to understand how Woody Allen and his editor Alisa Lepselter set you up perfectly for their engaging story. In the documentary Darfur Now, I edited a montage of angry people that culminated in a dirt devil that swept people. I had no idea what they were saying, I just let myself be led by their anger. Here the content of the visual determined the rhythm of the montage even though the

here the rhythm of the movements in the visual provides the connecting tissue and when that element is lacking then a pounding beat of music takes over the rhythmic succession

-

ments that follow a dramatic progression: dialogue and action. Both of these elements are recorded with their own internal rhythm either as separate entities or as a combination of the two. The editor can just follow these internal rhythms or play with them by speeding them up or slowing

which Democrat Aretha Gupta played by Mallika Sherawat and her Republican love interest Kyle Franklin played by

the feeling that they were still being rather apprehensive about each other. But when they start to discuss politics the ping their lines until they settle down and let the romance take over where I then added in pauses that as a viewer you takes or inserting pauses in the dialogue to slow it down. Also, you can do the opposite by simplifying lines, taking

words in a shot: when there is a one second pause you can increase the intensity of a reaction by doubling the speed

unrelated visuals, is used abundantly to compress time: aotg.com

twitter

facebook

29

ACE

Rhythm and Our Lives

thoughtful or tentative response.

red herrings can bore and confuse the viewer and when that happens you have lost your audience. If these two pests are

of the movements becomes either boring or incomprehen-

be removed, but when they’re part of an indispensable se-

very clearly and over the top in the kung fu genre where

re-time the rhythm.

who overcomes attacks by multiple villains at once. Bruce kicks to then almost stop to give us a primordial scream berhythm adjustment appears when obvious slow-motion is inserted to show the aesthetic beauty of the moves and to -

house 2: Last Call, I used speed-ups and slow motion many the trap of the operatic kung fu routine that doesn’t take realism very seriously. when they’re all strung together it becomes painfully clear issue. As an editor you reach this phase when you present your Editor’s Cut to the director. You have put all your

ing and well-edited but when they’re all strung together it becomes painfully clear that gelling them into an engaging

bination of information and emotion. Too much information leads to confusion and too much emotion deteriorates into melodrama. Pacing these elements perfectly is the task of the editor. Unfortunately you cannot set up rules for it because so much of it relies on the intuitive and inner rhythm ent to be successful, but you can hone your skills by watching a lot of movies and particularly bad movies: good movies are for entertainment and bad ones are for learning. Go a fun way to make watching a bad movie interesting while honing your skills in rhythm and pacing so that predicting the twists and turns in the story becomes a pleasant intelto be used as comparative material to make good ones shine but they’re also an indispensable educational tool to teach editors rhythm and pacing.

but now watching them all together you have to concentrate related: story and pacing. The story needs to make sense and be easy to understand, and you can accomplish this by -

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

30

ASE

Mrs Biggs Article Written by Cindy Clarkson Cindy Clarkson’s Website Cindy Clarkson’s IMDb Mrs. Biggs IMDb ASE Website

ASE Website aotg.com

twitter

facebook

31

ASE

Mrs Biggs

M

her relationship with small time crook Ronald Biggs, who became and then Brazil. The over arching English editor Ben Lester with Australian

rector Paul Whittington on episodes of the UK dramas DCI Banks gan assembling, knowing he’d go into hiatus when the Australian segment was shot before returning to complete the edit. going through the music of the late 50’s to early 70’s sourcing the sound track for the series. Charmian Biggs had provided a selection of music she and Ronnie listened to, and in turn the editing team looked at the charts of the year, went down the list into the lesser known hits and looked at the B side of the records so that the audience would likely recognise the band but not necessarily the song itself.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

32

ASE

Mrs Biggs

When the production moved to Australia, Mark was cover the Australian and Brazilian portions of the story. had cut, so he understood the progression of the show. The material set in England had a classical feel, whereas dom the style naturally became progressively fragmented Ben had asked that the multi-cam footage be kept as the Avid project manageable and made him focus on each shot for its own merit. Encouraged by Paul Whittington to Both editors commented that the performances by the leads Sheridan Smith and Daniel May were a pleasure to cut. Their ability to organically hit their continuity points time and time again, while giving a great performance, meant the edit became far less about selling the cut by disguising a problem, and more about focusing on the nuances of the performance. Upon completion of the shoot, Ben put together the Each episode was running around 65 minutes, which was worrying for what would ultimately be 45 minute episodes.

I would like to thank Ben and Mark for their time and enthusiasm in talking all things editing during their busy schedules. Curious about the editors? The following is a brief glimpse of Ben and Mark’s editing history. Ben Lester discovered editing as a teen, while visiting a mate’s father who is an editor and he was hooked. It opened his eyes to himself invaluable becoming the assistant, and so his career began. With a lot of hard work, Ben cut documentary while running a facilities’ post prothey brought projects in. In the last few years he recently made the move church. while moved between production and post. He was cutting short dramas for Australian director Anna Kokkinos. He moved into cutting documentary of a Lady where the actors wore radio mics the entire time the documentary team was there giving an unusually intimate look at the relationship the popular Australian series Seachange, scoring a couple of episodes after the series was established. He is currently working on the Blackfella Films documentary series First Contact.

worth of material. By lifting and moving around blocks of the script they discovered more dramatic ways

nie talking to the man who was organizing the train robbery. What was gleaned by moving the story blocks

schedule). Ultimately Mrs. Biggs is a love story. The end result is a taunt revelation of Charmian and Ronnie’s relationship, as they try to live a normal life while on the run. The series has won several awards, including ACCTA 2014 for Best Television Editing. aotg.com

twitter

facebook

33

ASE

The Hidden Universe

The Hidden Universe 3D was the first foray for the producer, director and editor into the IMAX realm, as well as the 3D element. Add a time restricted shoot with two 70mm film cameras (yes, you read right, it was shot on film) that had to be carried up into high altitude of nearly 5000 meters where it was so dry, the film became brittle and broke. With monotony you begin to see the challenges. For Wayne Hyett ASE, it was an adventure of patience, perseverance and wonder. As the title suggests, this spectacular science documentary takes the audience into a gobsmacking realm of unfathomable distant stars and then blows our mind with the possibility of seeing the universe as a tangible map. It really is uber cool. The film follows two Australian scientists, Jonathon Whitmore and Gregg Poole, as they travel to the high altitudes of the Chilean Alps to use two vastly different telescope arrays to reveal to us the wonder that is glimpsed by few and the astonishing human ingenuity that created the possibility to peer out into the cold depths. The script was not as developed as it possibly could have been, due to there being a small window of when they could film in Chilean Alps and so the tussle that would take 10 to 12 weeks to find its final 36 minute form began. There was a quick realization that although they had the spectacular 3D modeling of particular stars, galaxies and the universe itself already built by the astronomy department of Swinburne University, the story that encompassed these Article amazing 3D images was less than engaging. Written by To Wayne’s horror it wasn’t till he saw the material that Cindy Clarkson he became aware of the IMAX convention that documentary subjects rarely appear on screen speaking. Having cut numerous documentaries in his time, it was something hard to Cindy Clarkson’s Website accept in the initial phase of cutting, as it dulled his ability to allow the audience to engage with the two passionate sciCindy Clarkson’s IMDb entists. Hidden Universe IMDb While the creative team’s faith was periodically tested as to whether there was a film in the material, Wayne began ASE Website working to find a way to entice the audience to go on this journey of revelation. Because of the technical issues of podcast shooting in high altitudes there was a smaller amount of images to work with than intended and a limited number of

The Hidden Universe

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

34

ASE

The Hidden Universe

to go back into the cut and lengthen shots to allow the audience to enjoy and absorb the footage.

long he needed to hold edits, as it takes longer to absorb the visual information on such an encompassing format. leaves them with a sense of awe. It really is worth a look. My thanks to Wayne Hyett ASE for his generosity. Please seek out the podcast of the

35

astronomy images to use. Wayne’s focus was to tease out the two men’s story who were the lynchpins of the documentary. This was done using Jonathon’s love of music and Gregg’s joy of photography. Both are hobbies that everyone can appreciate and relate to, Fortunately for Wayne, both scientists were able to come into the edit suite three or four times during the edit, to update the ever-evolving narration. The more they could speak push the story forward. Would it be the scientist or the over arching narrator Miranda Richardson?

the edit they were able to go into the Swinburne Astronomy Department and use their 3D aotg.com

twitter

facebook

CCE

Inside Hemlock Grove: The Process of Transformative Television

36

CCE Website aotg.com

twitter

facebook

CCE

Article Written by

“If you watch all ten episodes of this season, Bert Kish, Picture Editor on Hemlock Grove

ler with a calm matter-of-factness that acted as counterpoint to the bustle of creatives around us. “It’s the end of the pale; we have a timeline we must adhere to – to make the very short turnaround for each ambitious episode, which are shot in only 9 days. close proximity to each other. In fact, the editorial departments are situated in one main hallway, a few of them connected in adjoining rooms making communication that much easier. This area is a creative vortex, where a mass of scenes are hurdled back and forth

Hemlock Grove IMDb CCE Website

editors on the show, mentioned that, to avoid confusion, revisions are highlighted with locacludes.

The second season of Hemlock Grove, executive produced by Eli Roth and based on the ership the on-demand provider’s own House of Cards, a political drama also with a household name attached: David Fincher, director of The Social Network and cult classic Fight Club. There are certain expectations for this new season of Hemlock Grove, which continues to keep your audience base invested in the incidents and characters at every turn, while also This aim is achieved from the serious collaboration of numerous technically savvy individuals, who contribute a wide range of aptitudes to execute a product that is delivered with a consistent tone and style. en behind the curtain – the unsung engineers of quality modern programming. I met with many members of the post-production team – picture editors, assistant editors, the visual

-

and the television industry at large. aotg.com

twitter

Season 2

facebook

37

CCE

Inside Hemlock Grove: The Process of Transformative Television

The First Assistant Editors, Michael England and John

-

picture editor’s system for cutting. “All the editors rely heavily on Michael and John to keep us on track and to handle an incredible amount of information coming from all direcAt the moment, they sit nearby on a couch in repose after a long day cutting a midseason episode to international the frame) and involves fewer layers of approval, the folks behind Hemlock Grove still must accede to the international versioning for Gaumont International Television (GIT). GIT is Hemlock Grove’s international distributor, and has sold the -

and Nicholls are assigned to compress what could be up to 9 minutes from the original duration into a 43-minute episode, with a one-minute recap. Nicholls admonishes. “We could have a whirlwind in ten in an instant send this circle of creatives back in the throes

said his role is to be on set, storyboard, and “plan the methcompleted by Andrew Karr at Atmosphere. Whelan is a many that involve the wolf transformations of actor Landon When an episode is locked, it is sent to Technicolor Toronto, the city’s longstanding postproduction house, for on-lining, Reed, Colin Moore, Julian Daboll, and Derrick Wood. This -

ing Dead, who joined Hemlock Grove at the outset of season two. sit in opposite chairs in his editing suite. Kish, who has di-

38

and in good spirits having nearly locked editorial on the sec-

apart from the crowd. Kish also emphasizes the importance of collaboration, a

Eglee, who has collaborated in the editing suite with James Cameron, stated his appreciation for the craft: “You can have a perfect scene, an actor who does a wonderful job, is technically perfect, but it can still suck and bore you to tears

stubborn solitude of individuals. Roslyn Kalloo, CCE, another editor on the show, mentioned she had many “creative -

Eglee chose Hemlock Grove because it was “real appoint-

Law, 3D generalist Josh Clark, and compositor Paul DeOliviera.

at new media seemed to be the auspicious route: “I really

this year’s Pompeii and Robocop (both shot in Toronto), aotg.com

twitter

facebook

-

Les Monteurs

Rencontre autour du film entre les murs Article Interview with Laurent Cantet & Robin Campillo Interview by Pascale Chavance Entre les murs IMDb Laurent Cantet IMDb Robin Campillo IMDb LMA Website LMA Videos

The following is an excerpt from the Les Monteurs Associés titled Rencontre Autour Du Film: Entre Les Murs, an interview with Laurent Cantet, réalisateur, and Robin Campillo, Montuer. It is pulled from a larger interview conducted on October 7, 2009. Members of the audience could ask questions of Cantet and Campillo. You can read the entire article here. Marc Daquin: Nous remercions beaucoup Laurent et Robin d’avoir accepté notre invitation. Laurent et Robin c’est une vieille collaboration; ils ont commencé à travailler ensemble sur un moyen métrage pour Arte: Les Sanguinaires... Laurent Cantet: On a même commencé avant puisque nous étions ensemble à l’IDHEC, dans la même promotion; on travaillait sur les films des uns et des autres. Marc Daquin:...ensuite Robin a monté le premier longmétrage de Laurent, Ressources humaines puis il a co-écrit le scénario de L’Emploi du temps, de Vers le sud et enfin d’Entre les murs. Stéphanie Léger (assistante monteuse) n’a pas pu venir ce soir. On la regrette parce que Laurent et Robin tenaient beaucoup à ce qu’elle participe à cette rencontre et nous aussi. Je pense qu’au cours de la discussion nous aurons l’occasion de revenir sur le rôle qu’elle a eu dans la fabrication du film.

LMA Website

Pascale Chavance: Une toute petite question avant d’aborder des choses plus intéressantes: cela fait combien de temps que vous vous baladez avec Entre les murs, com-

Become a Member aotg.com

twitter

facebook

39

Les Monteurs

bien de rencontres?... Vous ne savez plus? Laurent Cantet: Non, je ne sais plus... Pascale Chavance: Et vous n’en avez pas ras-le-bol?! (rires) Laurent Cantet: Non... J’ai effectivement passé à peu près un an; de juillet (2008) à juillet (2009) à ne faire que ça... et effectivement à avoir parfois épuisé mon envie d’en parler. Là, ça fait un petit moment que j’ai arrêté donc je vais essayer de retrouver l’élan. Pascale Chavance: À la sortie du film j’ai lu un papier sur le fait qu’au moment du montage, vous tourniez, vous vous arrêtiez pour monter, et vous retourniez. Est-ce exact? Est-ce que ça s’est passé comme ça? La salle de montage était dans le collège?

Article author: Robin Campillo

Article author: Laurent Cantet

Laurent Cantet: Non, on ne montait pas pendant le tournage. On avait dans la salle de classe voisine un Avid pour digitaliser et voir le soir même ou le lendemain ce qu’on avait tourné dans la journée et le voir avec l’écran partagé en quatre, pour voir les trois caméras en même temps. Et on faisait une espèce de montage virtuel en se disant: «Tiens, ça, ça va bien avec ça... Tiens, ce type de cadre, il faut y repenser parce que ça peut resservir». Et puis, peut-être Robin, tu as fait un essai sur une séquence ou deux... Robin Campillo: Oui. Il y avait un Avid... et il y avait aussi Stéphanie, l’assistante, qui était là! On est obligé de repartir un petit peu en amont sur la question du montage: Laurent avait vraiment envie depuis longtemps de faire un film un peu brouillon où la fiction surgirait progressivement du chaos. Et donc ça, ça a à voir avec le montage et le tournage. Il y avait ce bouquin de François Bégaudeau et dès l’écriture Laurent a fait des ateliers avec des élèves dans un collège. On a un peu filmé pour voir et on a commencé à monter des choses. Et puis c’est vrai que peu à peu on a acquis une espèce de maîtrise: la maîtrise des jeunes comédiens pour Laurent et pour le prof, la maîtrise des cadres, la maîtrise du montage, se sont faites en même temps et très en amont du film, ce qui est à mon avis assez rare. En ce qui concerne la question de l’assistante, je n’avais jamais réussi avant ce film à l’imposer sur tout le montage. Ce qui est très important, c’est qu’elle a été là pendant tout le tournage; elle rentrait les rushes. On a aotg.com

twitter

décidé sur l’Avid, après le début du tournage, que le film serait en scope; c’est aussi un effet du numérique et Laurent a tenu à ce que l’on recadre certains plans ce qui est habituellement assez difficile à faire. Stéphanie a eu une conscience des rushes. Du fait du multi-caméra les rushes représentaient plus de 140 heures; pour moi c’était impossible à gérer seul. Je pense qu’au début du dérushage on a déprimé très très fort et on s’est dit un truc tout bête: pour une fois, on ne saura pas tout ce qu’il y a dans les rushes. Je crois qu’à la fin on a tout vu, mais on est parti avec l’idée qu’une des tâches de Stéphanie était de dérusher plus que nous, puisqu’elle avait déjà conscience de ce qui avait été tourné. Elle avait présélectionné des choses. Pour la première fois on a réussi à être à deux machines et sur un film comme celui-ci c’était impossible que je monte le film seul. C’était hors de question. C’est la seule fois où j’ai réussi à avoir mon assistante avec moi sur tout le montage et je pense que ça nous a vraiment beaucoup aidé. Laurent Cantet: Ce que je voulais aussi ajouter c’est que dans la description que Robin vient de faire, dans la façon dont le film s’est fait, avec ces ateliers, avec ces débuts de montage – avec des essais de son parce qu’on ne savait pas comment ça allait pouvoir se passer – cela m’a permis de penser la mise en scène comme une espèce de dispositif dont on cherchait à tester l’efficacité. En se disant: le matériau est riche, il n’y a pas à avoir peur de ça, il faut juste trouver une méthode, une façon de lancer les scènes sans savoir exactement ce qui va se passer, puis de retravailler à partir de là, et puis prendre le risque de partir ailleurs d’un seul coup. Tout cela on l’a élaboré tout au long de cette année où on a travaillé ensemble. Pascale Chavance: Donc ateliers et écriture se faisaient parallèlement? Laurent Cantet: Oui. On avait quand même écrit une première version du scénario qui comprenait des copier/coller du bouquin associés à des scènes qu’on avait écrites et qui nous tenaient à cœur et des dialogues donnés à titre indicatif. Et puis le mercredi suivant, dans l’atelier, je leur suggérais une situation qui pouvait s’apparenter à; j’ai toujours essayé de ne jamais leur faire travailler la scène exacte qu’on allait tourner. On l’a fait une ou deux fois et je ne regrette effectivement pas d’avoir été plutôt dans le sens de la scène mais pas sur la scène elle-même, parce qu’au bout de deux fois ils se demandaient pourquoi ils recommençaient. Et donc là, ils

facebook

40

Les Monteurs

me proposaient des improvisations et on en retenait des éléments. Ça nous permettait aussi de créer des personnages, de sentir qui pouvait endosser tel ou tel personnage et de les pousser dans un jeu un peu plus extraverti. Et tout ça était réinjecté dans le scénario la semaine qui suivait...

sente du livre — qui est une suite de saynètes, d’instantanés — c’est un travail qui est là dès l’écriture du scénario ou cela fait-il partie des allers-retours avec les ateliers?

Pascale Chavance: Ils avaient lu le livre? Laurent Cantet: Certains disent l’avoir lu mais je ne suis pas sûr qu’ils l’aient vraiment lu. Par contre, ils n’ont jamais lu le scénario ou les dialogues. Thaddée Bertrand | Pour continuer sur le livre, il y a une construction dramatique totalement différente dans le film par rapport au livre, notamment le face-à-face avec Souleymane: le conseil de discipline, la “chute” de François... Est-ce que cette dramatisation, qui est ab-

Laurent Cantet: Non, c’était là dès le départ du scénario. C’est-à-dire que j’avais commencé à écrire il y a plusieurs années un film qui se déroulait comme le livre de François, dans l’enceinte d’un collège, et j’avais écrit l’histoire de Souleymane. À l’époque c’était cinq pages. Ce qui fait que le livre de François m’a plu, son aspect chronique, aurait été sûrement beaucoup plus difficile à tenir en film. Et on avait tous les deux envie d’une trame dramatique qui allait pouvoir porter tout ce qu’on avait envie de dire et qui était assez proche de ce que François dit dans le livre. François a tout de suite été intéressé par l’idée du conseil de discipline parce que le conseil de discipline c’est le moment où l’autorité se met le plus en scène. Au départ j’avais même l’intention de filmer le conseil de discipline en temps réel; avoir peut-être trente-cinq minutes de film sur le conseil de discipline, parce que pour avoir assisté en préparant le film à quelques conseils de discipline, ce sont des moments d’une dramaturgie incroyable. J’étais en larmes en sortant et les profs l’étaient souvent aussi. On sentait qu’il y avait là quelque chose d’important à filmer. L’histoire de Souleymane nous y amenait; on l’a conservée et on a développé ce personnage qui en fait endosse plusieurs personnages du livre. Benoît alavoine: Je voulais revenir sur l’écriture: on dit souvent que le monteur est le premier spectateur du film. Comme vous êtes scénariste du film, avez-vous déjà éprouvé du “parasitage” par rapport à ce que certains appellent l’œil neuf du monteur ou l’œil averti? Est-ce que vous assistez au tournage? Et quelle est la place de l’assistante dans ce dispositif particulier où vous êtes à la fois monteur et scénariste? Robin Campillo: Sincèrement je ne saurais pas répondre à la question du regard neuf... Pour moi les rushes c’est tellement difficile, je trouve que c’est une matière tellement dure que je n’arrive pas à voir... Forcément pour moi c’est autre chose. J’ai sans doute un regard neuf ; pour moi les rushes me font violence, j’ai du mal à accepter ce que je vois, ce que j’entends – c’est un peu terrifiant ce que je dis! (rires) J’ai réalisé un long métrage et même sur mon propre film, je suis devenu amnésique à partir du moment où je me suis retrouvé seul avec les rushes. J’ai l’impression que je n’ai pas de problèmes avec ça. Alors, sur ce film, vu la longueur des rushes, vu les trois caméras, c’est encore plus facile, parce que le cadre n’est pas si obsessionnel, si central, que quand on a un tournage à une caméra. Il y a vraiment quelque chose qui se produit quand on monte avec trois caméras: d’un seul coup le cadre a moins d’importance – c’est l’espace qui m’intéresse, plus que le cadre. Sur cette question il y a des effets pervers quand même, c’est pour ça que Laurent ne me veut pas sur le tournage, car je suis un obsessionnel mais pas dans le bon sens du terme.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

41

Les Monteurs

C’est-à-dire que je regarde des détails qui n’ont strictement aucun intérêt et je peux devenir fou... Je me souviens sur L’Emploi du temps, c’était pénible parce que c’était un tournage assez difficile et je l’appelais tous les soirs, ils étaient tous crevés et moi j’avais des problèmes avec tout, pas avec les scènes mais avec des détails, des cartons par exemple: «Ils font neufs!» Donc évidemment au bout d’un moment Laurent n’en pouvait plus, il me laissait parler... Pour moi, monter un film c’est comprendre le film. C’est comprendre ce qui se passe entre les personnages, c’est rentrer en intelligence avec le film. Quand les rushes je les vois comme ça, je trouve que c’est idiot ; ce n’est pas que ça n’a pas de sens, c’est que ça n’a pas de chair. Sur mon rapport avec l’assistante, encore une fois, avec Stéphanie on a pu travailler tout le temps ensemble et je crois que la production a compris que ce serait comme ça maintenant. Le film n’a pas coûté très cher et curieusement j’ai pu avoir une assistante sur tout le montage, donc visiblement ce n’est pas qu’une question financière. Ce qui est bien, c’est qu’elle n’était pas dans son coin, on a beaucoup discuté avec elle. Et sur des choses qui pouvaient manquer elle a fait un travail considérable de recherches de détails, de postures de personnages, de bouts de dialogues à mettre en off... Parce qu’en même temps, je ne supporte pas de travailler trop longtemps. Sincèrement, je pense qu’on ne peut travailler que six heures par jour. Et puis j’ai refusé que ce soit loin de la maison, on a loué un appartement et on a fait un peu nos princesses... N’empêche qu’à la fin, je pense que c’est mon meilleur montage. Il n’y a pas de miracles... Les films où les gens travaillent de 8h à 21h devant des écrans, c’est complètement délirant et surtout, moi je ne vois pas ce qu’on voit de plus. Et c’est important parce que sur un film où il y a eu 140 heures de rushes, on n’a pas galéré, on n’a pas eu de retard et on a réussi à garder notre énergie. Parce qu’on sait bien qu’au montage il y a des moments où il faut s’arrêter de monter, prendre un temps et puis revenir voir ce que ça donne. On n’est pas là en train de faire des raccords, il faut arrêter avec ça. Et puis il y a un souci pédagogique avec l’Avid: qu’est-ce qu’on apprend à un assistant quand on est sur Avid? Moi, je ne sais pas transmettre... Là, le fait qu’on ait pu discuter des plans, qu’il y ait eu beaucoup de discussions autour de la fin du film – c’est un peu ça aussi la pédagogie au fond – c’est le seul moment où je me suis dit que j’apprenais quelque chose à Stéphanie, alors que jusqu’à maintenant je trouvais ça catastrophique. Sur la gestion d’un long métrage c’est la première fois que je me suis dit: elle voit comment je fonctionne. Jusqu’à main-tenant elle était très peu là ; les assistants rentrent les rushes, et puis voilà. Je sais que dorénavant je l’imposerai. Mais pour revenir à la question de savoir si le fait que je sois scénariste ça a posé quelque chose de...?

Des fois, elle n’y est pas. Et donc ce que je dis au réalisateur en général c’est: «Tu te racontes des histoires avec tes rushes. Mais moi avec la trivialité de la matière je ne retrouve pas ce que tu cherches”. Et c’est pour ça que je parlais de “parasitage”. Laurent Cantet: Je crois que là-dessus on est l’un et l’autre assez vigilants. À partir du moment où le tournage est fini, pour moi le scénario n’existe plus. Il reste à regarder ce qu’il y a devant nous et on part de là. Le scénario n’existe plus, et en même temps on a des numéros de claps et grosso modo tous mes films sont montés tels qu’ils ont été écrits. La seule intervention radicale que l’on peut avoir sur le scénario c’est de supprimer, quand justement ce qu’on cherchait à y mettre n’y est pas. Il n’y a aucun fétichisme sur le scénario de la part de Robin comme de la mienne, et on l’oublie totalement. Robin Campillo: On n’a pas le scénario au montage. On n’y revient jamais. Pour moi c’est

42

Benoît alavoine: C’est la question de l’intention en réalité. Au scénario il y a des intentions que vous avez sûrement voulu impulser au film et que tu vas aller chercher dans les rushes. aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Les Monteurs

comme si l’écriture était dans la machine. Nous, quand on arrive au montage, le scénario est “brûlé”. Benoît Alavoine: Vous faites un séquencier quand même, non? robin Campillo | Non, jamais. C’est personnel ; j’ai du mal à m’y réfé-rer. Ça me perd, je ne m’y retrouve pas. Laurent Cantet: Par ailleurs on va assez vite au but. C’est-à-dire qu’on ne fait pas de premier ours. La construction est au départ dans le scénario ; si elle marche tant mieux, si elle ne marche pas il peut nous arriver d’inverser, mais rarement. Robin Campillo: Justement, sur la question de l’intentionnalité des scènes, il y avait toute une série de scènes qu’on avait imaginées qui ne fonctionnaient pas: on n’a même pas essayé de les monter. Il y a une chose très importante dans ce film, c’est que comme François était un délégué à la mise en scène dans la scène – c’est lui qui redistribuait la parole – il était d’une certaine manière le double de Laurent. Et on ne voulait pas avoir l’impression qu’il aille à la pêche aux répliques. Et il y a une scène qui était comme ça. Alors soit on déprime pendant deux jours en sachant qu’à la fin on va la mettre à la poubelle, soit on passe à autre chose et on l’oublie. On n’est vraiment pas des fétichistes du scénario. Au contraire. Le travail de montage c’est aussi faire en sorte que les intentions disparaissent. Qu’il y ait une réalité de l’image, que quelque chose d’incontestable se produise. Sur un film comme ça, le montage est sans rapport avec la fiction; c’est détaché, c’est autre chose. Benoît Alavoine: Et vous avez coupé des séquences? Laurent Cantet: Oui, toute la fin du film. Il y avait une scène où on suivait Souleymane à Bamako. On en a monté pas mal de versions différentes, plus ou moins longues, avec pour finir le sentiment qu’on recentrait sur une histoire particulière et que cela «éteignait” ce qu’on voulait dire sur l’ensemble du film. On l’a coupée en pensant qu’il valait mieux retrouver ce qui se passe dans la réalité d’une classe: quand quelqu’un est éjecté de l’institution, il disparaît. Les profs ne savent pas ce qu’il devient. On reste avec des questions: est-ce qu’il est parti en Afrique? Est-ce qu’il a retrouvé une place dans une autre collectivité? Et ça m’a semblé plus intéressant que cette fin très fermée qu’on proposait au départ. Dès la deuxième projection du montage on a décidé qu’il ne fallait pas finir comme ça. Robin Campillo: On dit qu’on ne redistribue pas le film au montage... On avait ces plans dont on ne s’est pas du tout servi pendant le film, de cours vides, et notamment des plans de classes vides. À un moment pendant le montage, on a décidé d’enlever tout ce qu’il y aotg.com

avait entre les scènes, d’aller au bout de ce qu’on avait décidé ; de passer d’une scène à l’autre, et l’année passera comme ça. Les plans de salles vides, on les voulait et on les a mis à la fin, comme une évidence. J’ai juste un petit regret au montage c’est qu’il y avait de la musique à la fin du film. Sur le match de foot, il y a eu un moment où c’était très chorégraphié et je trouvais ça intéressant sur un film par ailleurs assez aride que d’un seul coup on ait une espèce de bulle de musique. Je trouvais ça “putassier” et bien en même temps, mais Laurent n’est pas comme ça! (rires) Laurent Cantet: C’est-à-dire que le film aurait pu finir en pub pour Hollywood chewinggum ... (rires) Marielle Issartel: François Bégaudeau, l’auteur du livre est professeur, co-scénariste et il joue dans le film son propre rôle? Laurent Cantet: Il est aussi auteur de roman et critique. Il a joué dans quelques courtsmétrages mais dans le film il ne joue pas son propre rôle. Marielle Issartel: Est-ce que dans le livre il y a aussi cette organisation de petites trahisons, de refus de prendre position, cet engrenage qui amène à la catastrophe? Laurent Cantet: Dans le livre, François ne se ménage pas, il est souvent mis face à ses échecs, face à des maladresses. C’est d’ailleurs souvent ce que les profs ont reproché au film ; montrer un prof trop faillible. C’est quelque chose que François endosse très facilement parce qu’il l’a éprouvé en tant que prof et il a l’honnêteté de l’exprimer. Après, quand je dis qu’il ne joue pas son propre rôle, c’est que toute l’histoire de Souleymane, dans laquelle il est partie prenante, ne se serait jamais déroulée comme ça dans sa classe. Je pense qu’il l’aurait désamorcée différemment, qu’il n’aurait certainement pas eu cette espèce de mauvaise conscience et qu’il aurait fait éclater les choses très différemment. Il a fallu que François se fasse violence par rapport à ça, parce qu’il avait le sentiment qu’on n’était pas très loin de lui, que ce personnage allait lui être associé et qu’il y a des aspects de ce personnage qu’il ne revendique pas, en tant que pédagogue, en tant que prof. Mais il l’a joué, comme les élèves ont joué. Après, c’est vrai que ces multiples rôles ont créé une complicité entre nous que j’ai rarement eu sur un tournage avec un acteur. Quand Robin disait que François était mon double à l’intérieur des scènes, c’est exactement ça. Le matin avant le début de chaque journée de tournage on se retrouvait autour d’un café et puis pendant une heure on dégageait

twitter

facebook

43

Les Monteurs

complicité mais en fait il est dans l’ironie. Et c’est terrible, moi je trouve que c’est d’une violence terrible ce film, c’est vraiment: «entre les murs». Ce n’est pas simplement un lieu où chacun se cherche, c’est “enfermé”, enfin je l’ai ressenti comme ça ; je suis peut-être très sensible sur ce sujet.

les enjeux de la scène, les phrases que je tenais à entendre, dites par untel ou untel. Il avait déjà en tête un canevas de la scène très précis dans laquelle il avait la même latitude d’improvisation que les élèves, mais il était quand même garant de l’organisation, de l’enchaînement des charnières de la scène. Pas toujours, parce que par ailleurs j’allais voir les élèves séparément et je leur disais: «Toi, quand François va dire ça, toi tu vas dire ça, et quand elle, elle va dire ça, tu vas répondre ça». Eux aussi avaient des «morceaux» de scène en tête pour faire avancer la narration. Mais François était une pièce décisive dans l’évolution de la dramaturgie de chaque séquence. Robin Campillo: Il faut imaginer en plus que les scènes sont des plans séquences en multicaméra. C’est ça que j’ai trouvé extraordinaire comme processus: la caméra est lancée, on joue et en même temps Laurent interrompt la scène comme il l’entend et on reprend un peu avant, un peu après, sans couper la caméra. Même François pouvait interrompre la scène. C’était un truc pénible au dérushage, mais assez agréable sur le tournage, cette impression que les choses avançaient par touches. Il y avait une caméra sur François, une caméra sur les personnages qui parlaient et une caméra sur la classe – les élèves qui s’emmerdaient – et d’un seul coup il pouvait y avoir là quelque chose d’intéressant. La scène était refaite même là-dessus. Je pense qu’il s’est passé quelque chose entre le cinéma de Laurent et le numérique. Quand on parle d’hyperréalité, justement ce n’est pas naturaliste, il y a quelque chose de plus dur. C’est une autre manière de faire des films, en tout cas moins paniquante, moins sacralisée, c’est-à-dire: le clap, le moteur, etc. Quelque chose de plus... impur et qui est intéressant, passionnant. Marielle Issartel: Par rapport à la négociation, il me semble que ce film pourrait être étudié avec profit pour savoir ce qui ne va pas. Parce que c’est de la négociation mais c’est de la négociation sans culture de négociation donc ça ne marche pas beaucoup. Ça marche un peu, sur des petits coups, mais sur les gros coups ça ne marche pas. Par exemple c’est merveilleux, le conseil de classe: les élèves y vont, mais la petite elle balance, elle balance à Souleymane sur le prof, elle rapporte ses propos de façon tendancieuse parce qu’à ce moment-là elle a envie de dire ça pour se venger du prof et elle «fout la zone”. Tout ça ce sont des choses qu’on met en place mais il n’y a pas de véritable éducation ; la pédagogie institutionnelle le fait, mais le fait dans des endroits qui sont des petits isolats. Il n’y a pas grand-chose, ça ne se développe pas beaucoup la pédagogie institutionnelle alors que ça devrait se développer partout. Donc il y a de la négociation, les enfants savent qu’ils doivent être respectés et qu’ils sont des individus mais ils le font en revendication, ils ne sont pas entendus. Le prof sait qu’il ne peut pas être le magistère donc il essaye d’être dans la

aotg.com

Robin Campillo: Pourtant c’est marrant, c’est quand même le seul film de Laurent où les gens rigolent! (rires) C’est vrai, dans L’Emploi du temps c’est quand même difficile de trouver une échappée... Sur la question de la fin, à un moment l’inconscient parle. Si le film se termine comme ça, c’est qu’on l’a voulu. S’il y a du pessimisme, il faut l’assumer pleinement. Sur cette question de la négociation... Je vais en revenir à ce que je disais sur la fin du film quand je voulais mettre de la musique (rires), c’est très naïf: quand il y avait de la musique sur le match de foot à la fin, on se disait un truc presque rhétorique: “O.K., c’est le bordel, mais c’est assez beau ce qu’on fait ensemble”. Et j’ai plus ce manque là que l’idée de savoir s’il fallait mettre ça à la fin ou Henriette. Sur ce que vous dîtes sur la négociation, vous avez raison, ils ne sont pas formés. Mais quand même, il y a une forme de noblesse à la vie que ça crée. Je me souviens, quand le film est allé à Cannes, franchement, vu la rapidité des dialogues, on pensait qu’à la lecture des sous-titres les gens allaient être complètement largués. Et en fait quand on a su que, pendant les projections de vente à l’étranger, les gens hurlaient de rire et quand on l’a vu dans la salle, il y avait des gens qui rigolaient sur des choses, on ne savait même plus pourquoi... Je pense que l’écart, dans le film, entre le rire et l’impression dépressive générale, est maximal. Voilà... et j’ai reparlé de la musique à la fin! (rires) Je pense qu’il y a quelque chose d’extrêmement naïf dans la position que je défendais, mais qui est lié au fait qu’il y a très peu de films qui sont à ce point sur des joutes verbales. Ce qui se raconte entre les gens dans le film me touche vraiment, parce que ça n’arrête pas d’être des positionnements et on voit à quel point les gens changent de position. Il y a un point de vue politique dans le film mais au ras des pâquerettes et pour moi il n’y a que dans un film de Laurent qu’on arrive à faire ça. On est les pieds sur terre et c’est ce qui explique que les gens ont besoin de la rhétorique, d’avoir des joutes. Marc Daquin: Dans le film on est dans un confort d’écoute formidable. Ça fuse dans tous les sens, il y a un brouhaha, c’est le chaos et on ne rate rien, c’est assez stupéfiant. Il y a là un énorme travail qui m’a sidéré. Laurent Cantet: C’est le résultat d’un dispositif très complexe dont je vais toucher deux mots: on avait carrément deux Cantar qui fonctionnaient en même temps et donc seize pistes simultanées. Ce qui veut dire qu’il y a un mot récupéré sur le micro plafond et puis

twitter

facebook

44

Les Monteurs

un mot mieux timbré sur le HF de la voisine qui n’était pas prévu pour ça mais qui sert à ce moment-là. Stéphanie a commencé tout ce travail-là quand on montait; elle allait chercher ces petites “rustines” qui font que les dialogues devenaient compréhensibles. Elle sélectionnait, elle baissait les pistes qui gênaient. Et puis après il y a eu un montage son qui a finalement duré peu de temps: huit semaines, sachant que le montage son c’est en fait le montage parole; on n’a rien ajouté comme ambiances. Le montage image a duré trois mois et demi. Le mixage trois semaines, ce qui n’est pas énorme. Marc Daquin: C’est le montage le plus long par rapport à tes autres films? Laurent Cantet: Oui, habituellement c’est six à huit semaines de montage. Là, on a l’impression d’être resté des années dans la salle de montage! Lise Beaulieu: Et comment vous y preniez-vous pour les trois caméras? Et avec seize pistes au son? Robin Campillo: Les seize pistes, je ne les ai pas du tout gérées, d’habitude je m’amuse à faire du montage son, là pas du tout ; il y avait Stéphanie qui s’occupait d’aller rechercher des sons quand c’était problématique à l’écoute. Laurent Cantet: Et vérifier que ce qu’on avait monté allait être audible un jour... Lise Beaulieu: Physiquement, vous aviez les seize pistes? Robin Campillo: Oui.

Robin Campillo: Si, si, c’était assez compliqué. Ce qui était important par rapport à Stéphanie c’est qu’elle allait chercher des répliques que nous n’entendions pas. Elle nous faisait des prémontage de ça, scène par scène. Bernard Sasia: Laurent, étiez-vous souvent là dans la salle de montage? Comment se passe le rapport entre vous deux? Et deuxième question: par rapport au choix des prises, vous parliez de premier montage fait sur les trois caméras, est-ce que vous preniez certaines prises, dites “bonnes” ou “témoins” et alliez voir après sur chaque réplique les autres prises? Laurent Cantet: Je suis toujours là au montage (rires), c’est un moment que j’aime beaucoup et je n’ai pas envie de laisser à Robin le privilège de le goûter sans moi... Et j’ai l’impression que nous n’avons pas négligé de prises... En fait, ce que faisait Robin, c’était de faire cette espèce de montage en direct, sur toutes les prises. Et puis on voyait des blocs qui se détachaient ; on se disait: «Ce moment-là, ils sont très très bien dans cette prise, on va le prendre. Ce moment-là ils sont mieux dans la prise 5” et on prenait la prise 5. Après, dans ces blocs-là, on recommençait à disséquer en disant: “Sur la caméra 2 de telle prise, est-ce qu’ils ne sont pas mieux?” et on allait voir. Mais on partait de blocs qui n’avaient pas grand chose à voir avec le montage en luimême, qui étaient plus des moments, des «unités d’échanges» si on veut. Bernard Sasia: Est-ce que vous doubliez les blocs, est-ce que vous les mettiez bout-àbout sur des répliques, ou sur des morceaux de séquences afin de pouvoir les juger?

Lise Beaulieu: Ça veut dire que vous aviez seize pistes au son et trois pistes images? Robin Campillo: C’est ça, mais on a fait un truc très particulier ; on a dérushé en montant. On avait les trois caméras et je m’amusais déjà à passer d’une caméra à l’autre. On voulait garder quelque chose d’instinctif. Ce qui nous intéressait aussi c’était de faire des raccords sur les mêmes personnages qui parlaient, que ça “saute” un peu, toujours sur la question des joutes, pour donner une idée que la personne qui est en train d’expliquer quelque chose piétine. Et puis tout le monde le sait mais les raccords naturels ne fonctionnent pas du tout. On n’avait pas peur aussi de réutiliser le même plan; il y a de vrais doublons dans le film.

aotg.com

Lise Beaulieu: Mais vous n’avez jamais dissocié les trois caméras? Vous ne vous êtes pas servi des trois caméras comme de trois prises différentes?

Robin Campillo: On l’a fait, ça se passait différemment selon les scènes, on a quand même beaucoup avancé “aux instruments”, sans vraiment de méthode... Laurent Cantet: Tous les soirs Robin avait l’impression d’avoir trouver une méthode! (rires) Et puis le lendemain... Robin Campillo: Sur la présence de Laurent, je me suis aperçu que s’il n’est pas là je suis paniqué. En général je n’aime pas trop être seul. On est à peu près d’accord, donc on se «monte le bourrichon», on se dit qu’on a raison, ça nous rassure un peu... On a quand même eu un moment de déprime au dérushage. Les deux premières semaines je ne com-

twitter

facebook

45

Les Monteurs

prenais rien à ce que je voyais, on était dépassé par les rushes. Quand j’étais autorisé à passer sur le tournage et qu’on voyait un peu les rushes, on se disait: “Oh, c’est riche!” Et puis quand on est arrivé au montage et qu’on a vu que c’était effectivement riche... C’est pour ça que je ne prends pas beaucoup de notes sur les rushes, parce qu’en fait les notes je les fais avec les rushes: je mets bout-à-bout des éléments. Il y a un truc extraordinaire dans l’Avid, de les retravailler, comme de la matière. Le problème que ça pose, c’est qu’après c’est très difficile d’expliquer qu’il faut du recul, attendre un peu avant de voir ce qu’on a fait. Mais sur la question du: “on avance, on fait les choses plutôt que d’y réfléchir”, il y a un truc assez fascinant avec le virtuel.

de la preuve. Ce travail-là, d’aller revoir toutes les prises, on l’a fait pendant tout le montage. C’était compliqué quand même parce qu’il y avait des prises de vingt minutes, une demi-heure et il y avait des “pastilles” à l’intérieur qui faisaient cinq minutes.

Bernard Sasia: Vous montiez pendant le tournage?

Laurent Cantet: Pas seulement. La fin devait durer sept-huit minutes et elle est tombée d’un coup. Et puis les scènes étaient assez élastiques, c’est-à-dire qu’il se passait énormément de choses dans chaque prise. On est arrivé à un moment à donner le sentiment d’un temps réel mais on aurait pu raccourcir ou rallonger certaines scènes sans problème – je crois que je ne réponds pas à ta question...

Robin Campillo: Non, non. On regardait les rushes. Laurent Cantet: Mais par contre on les regardait systématiquement en split-screen. Robin Campillo: Il y a eu deux semaines où on se disait: “Pfffff...” Mais comme on trouvait ça bien, ça allait... Parce que ça nous est arrivé d’avoir des déconvenues, notamment sur L’Emploi du temps. Quand on a vu le bout-à-bout du film, on était déprimé, on a appelé la production en disant que c’était un navet... On n’arrivait même plus à se motiver, on a remonté la pente tout doucement et c’est au bout d’un moment qu’on s’est dit finalement: “c’est pas mal” et puis à la fin on était super enthousiaste. Mais il y a eu un moment où on s’est dit que le bout-à-bout était catastrophique. Je ne savais pas trop quoi dire à Laurent, on est allé manger ensemble, on ne se parlait pas (rires) et c’est quand les productrices sont venues et qu’on les a vues ressortir en pleurant, qu’on s’est dit: «Bon, on va avancer et puis on réfléchira après!” (rires) Ça arrive beaucoup au montage, ça: de redécouvrir l’émotion. Je ne pouvais pas dire les acteurs sont bons ou pas bons: je ne ressentais rien en voyant le bout-à-bout. Là, sur Entre les murs on était quand même complètement emballé par ce qu’on voyait. Par contre on était dépassé, comme si le film courrait devant nous et que nous étions en train de lui courir après, à essayer de l’attraper au lasso! Il y avait une matière convulsive, brute, qui était assez sidérante. Après, c’est en rentrant dans le vif du sujet, en montant, qu’on a réussi à la maîtriser. J’ai toujours l’impression au montage que c’est très dur pendant toute une période et puis il y a un moment où ça devient plus facile et à ce moment-là, c’est bien quand il reste encore un mois. C’est rare mais on a eu ce temps-là, on a pu revoir les choses – nous, on fait comme beaucoup de monteurs, à la fin du montage on fait un nouveau dérushage, c’est un moment où on prend du plaisir à revoir les rushes et à se dire: «Ah oui mais il y avait ça» et puis quand on essaye une autre prise on se dit: “Mais non, on avait raison”, c’est de l’ordre aotg.com

Benoît Alavoine: Il faisait combien ce premier montage? Laurent Cantet: Il devait faire trois heures à peu près. On a enlevé quarante minutes. Benoît Alavoine: À l’intérieur des scènes?

Benoît alavoine: En fait la question était au départ: est-ce qu’il y a un certain nombre de scènes écrites dans le scénario qui n’ont pas été tournées en se disant ça va être trop? Ou alors est-ce qu’elles ont été coupées au montage parce que... Laurent Cantet: Coupées au montage. Il y a même certaines scènes qui ont été tournées trois ou quatre fois, différemment, juste pour essayer. Marc Daquin: Le même jour, ou bien un autre jour en se disant: “On va essayer de reprendre cette scène”? Laurent Cantet: Après avoir vu les rushes, après avoir réfléchi à une autre stratégie d’entrer dans la scène, c’était deux jours après, on demandait juste à la costumière de retrouver les costumes en se disant peut-être qu’on pourra “mixer” les deux. Potentials: (PAGE 7) thaddée Bertrand | Pour continuer sur le scénario, Robin vous êtes co-scénariste sur les films de Laurent Cantet: est-ce que vous pouvez nous parler de ça? Est-ce que c’est un désir de Laurent de vous associer à l’écriture du scénario?

twitter

facebook

46

Les Monteurs

précipité, et comment elle est devenue chef monteuse des 14 films suivants de Rainer Werner Fassbinder, une collaboration ininterrompue pendant 6 ans et demi sur tous ses films (de 1977 à 1982.) Elle nous parlera aussi de sa collaboration avec d’autres réalisateurs et de la situation des monteurs en Allemagne.

Le secret de Juliane Lorenz

Juliane Lorenz: Merci beaucoup pour l’invitation. C’est vraiment, comment dire une... The following is an excerpt from the Les Monteurs Associés titled Juliane Lorenz a monté les 14 derniers films de Rainer Werner Fassbinder. It is pulled from a larger interview conducted on December 3, 2008. Lorenz’s was broken down into sections and made available to members of Les Monteurs Associés. You can read the entire article here.

Pascale Chavance: Une joie...

Introduction

Quand j’ai commencé, c’était la grande époque du nouveau cinéma allemand qui a été inspiré par la Nouvelle Vague française – bien sûr, ce n’est pas nous qui l’avons inventée. Pour expliquer comment je suis devenue monteuse, c’était pas du tout mon rêve, c’était pas du tout mon idée, c’était seulement mon destin (rires).

Juliane Lorenz a monté les 14 derniers films de Rainer Werner Fassbinder.

Article Interview with Juliane Lorenz Interview by Pascale Chavance Juliane Lorenz IMDb LMA Website LMA Videos

Elle a aussi joué dans certains de ses films et participé à leur production. Elle a écrit plusieurs livres sur le cinéaste avec lequel elle a vécu quelques années. Elle a ensuite travaillé avec plusieurs réalisatrices et réalisateurs allemands, notamment Werner Schroeter. Elle dirige maintenant la Fondation Rainer Werner Fassbinder, à Berlin. (http://www.fassbinderfoundation.de/node.php/fr/home) Le 3 décembre 2008, elle est venue à Paris pour une rencontre organisée par Les Monteurs Associés. Nous sommes heureux de publier aujourd’hui l’essentiel des propos tenus au cours de cette soirée. Axelle Malavieille: Bonsoir, Juliane Lorenz est notre invitée ce soir. Elle va nous parler de ses débuts, comment elle est arrivée très jeune dans le montage et que tout s’est aotg.com

Juliane Lorenz: Une joie!... (rires) C’est la première fois que je parle en France devant des monteurs et puis aussi en Allemagne on ne parle pas beaucoup de montage. Les débuts, l’assistanat

Quand j’étais petite, ma mère s’est remariée. Mon beau-père réalisait des courtsmétrages, il ne gagnait pas beaucoup d’argent, et il m’emmenait le week-end au cinéma... J’avais cinq ans et c’est comme ça que ça a commencé: j’ai vu des films. Mon idée était de devenir romancière, et puis j’ai grandi, j’ai passé mon baccalauréat et on m’a demandé: qu’estce que tu veux faire? Ça n’était pas encore très précis ce que je voulais faire au début, et à ce moment il n’existait pas encore d’école pour apprendre le montage. Ce n’est qu’à partir de 1966 que deux écoles en Allemagne se sont créées, une école à Berlin Deutsche Filmund Fernsehakademie (www.dffb.de) et l’autre à Munich Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film (http://www.hff-muenchen.de). Et l’autre possibilité était de commencer d’apprendre sur le tas à faire du cinéma et comme ça je finirais peut-être par savoir ce que je voulais vraiment. Je ne voulais plus étudier à cette époque; j’avais commencé des études de sciences politiques en cours du soir, mais je considérais que la vie n’était pas faite pour étudier mais d’abord pour agir.

twitter

facebook

47

Les Monteurs

Et il y avait aussi ma mère qui me disait: “tu dois apprendre... la projection par exemple, comment le film défile dans le projecteur”, et finalement j’ai fait un stage très court dans un laboratoire à Munich, mais pas comme un stagiaire d’aujourd’hui, j’étais vraiment employée. L’industrie du cinéma en Allemagne à cette époque – le milieu des années 70 – c’était très peu de chose, c’était d’un côté les jeunes cinéastes comme Werner Herzog, Fassbinder, Wim Wenders qui commençaient à créer leurs propres productions et de l’autre côté c’était les vieux producteurs qui faisaient des films de sexe. Vraiment l’Allemagne était cassée après la guerre. Pas de cinéma artistique. Schlöndorff a dû aller en France pour apprendre, il a été assistant de Louis Malle, de Melville... Et maintenant le destin commence. J’ai été pendant deux mois assistante de la chef monteuse de la Bavaria, Margot von Schlieffen – grâce à ma mère qui nous a mis en relation – et j’ai appris très vite parce que c’était manuel, concret. J’étais deuxième assistante, je numérotais le son et je faisais le café.

Après ce film, Ila von Hasperg m’a demandé de travailler sur le prochain Fassbinder, la Roulette chinoise.

J’étais heureuse parce que la 1ère assistante m’aimait beaucoup. Elle appréciait Le mon caractère résolu: je voulais agir. Normalement c’était la 1ère assistante qui devait faire la synchronisation des rushes, pas la deuxième. Après deux ou trois semaines j’ai demandé: “est-ce que je peux le faire?” et la monteuse, Madame Von Schlieffen ne devait pas le voir (rires) ça aussi c’était secret. Il y avait des deuxièmes assistantes qui le restaient pendant deux, trois, quatre ans. Devenir première assistante, mon Dieu, c’était quelque chose! Et certaines le faisaient pendant 6 ou 7 ans. Pour moi, c’était pas le rêve de ma vie. Mon idée, c’était d’aller vite.

aotg.com

Et ensuite j’ai encore eu la chance d’être assistante d’une monteuse, Ila von Hasperg, qui travaillait sur un film dont je savais seulement qu’il y avait quelque part Fassbinder. Le nom était très connu en Allemagne, mais le nom était connecté avec une image horrible, horrible (rires). Ce n’était pas lui qui réalisait, c’était le film d’un de ses collaborateurs. J’étais à cette époque première assistante, et je disais encore: “je veux faire, je veux faire.” La rencontre et les débuts avec RW Fassbinder

Je me souviens que je voulais toujours voir ce que faisait la monteuse. Elle avait un rideau derrière sa table de montage et le rideau était toujours fermé alors de temps en temps j’y allais, je me lançais et elle me disait: “vous n’avez pas quelque chose à faire?” “Oh! excusez-moi, bien sûr...» C’était très sérieux, très sérieux, très... secret. Et ça m’énervait.

Et j’ai eu la chance de travailler avec une réalisatrice, une femmece qui était très rare dans le documentaire à cette époquequi était aussi monteuse.

Quand on a fini un film, qu’on est au chômage, on doit s’inscrire à l’Arbeitsamt [équivalent de l’Anpe], il faut être disponible et on vous contacte. C’est comme ça que pendant onze semaines, j’ai eu la chance de travailler avec cette réalisatrice qui faisait un film sur Léningrad (aujourd’hui: St Pétersbourg.) Elle m’a emmenée à Berlin et elle m’a beaucoup laissé faire parce que j’étais une jeune fille, j’avais 19 ans et je disais: “je veux faire, s’il vous plait, je veux faire, laissez-moi faire” et pour elle c’était agréable, et j’ai fait un peu du montage son de ce film. Quand on a mixé le film, elle a vu que je n’avais pas beaucoup d’expérience. Par exemple une voiture passait dans l’image et elle me disait: “mais on doit l’entendre!” – “Ah!!?”, c’était quelque chose que je ne savais pas! (rires). C’est comme ça qu’on apprend.

C’était en 76, il y a eu trois semaines de tournage et elle était toujours seule dans la salle de montage et un jour, c’était le grand jour, le grand monsieur est arrivé (rires) et il était incroyablement gentil. J’étais jeune et elle m’a présentée, “c’est Juliane” et le contact s’est établi. Je ne sais pas pourquoi le contact s’est établi. Au début j’étais très timide, je n’osais pas parler, il était très concentré et il ne parlait pas beaucoup. Elle lui a montré le montage et il a dit: “très bien, au revoir” et c’était tout. Alors pour moi qui débutais je me suis dit: ah, c’est le monteur qui fait le film et le réalisateur vient et il dit bonjour et au revoir (rires). Elle aussi a aimé que je sois quelqu’un qui voulait faire des choses, et donc elle pouvait s’occuper seulement du montage, pendant la Roulette chinoise. Je me suis chargée du son, ce n’était pas du son direct, c’était du son témoin ce qui signifiait qu’il fallait tout doubler. C’était comme ça pour tous les films de Rainer jusqu’à Despair (tourné en 1977) où il a commencé à faire du son direct. Maintenant je dois un peu expliquer Fassbinder. C’était l’un des membres du nouveau

twitter

facebook

48

Les Monteurs

cinéma allemand, et le plus productif parce qu’il faisait au début trois films par an. Il était très rapide, très concentré, c’était une vedette en Allemagne avec son style “wild boy”. On lui a attribué toutes les images possibles, mais c’était quelque chose qui ne m’intéressait pas vraiment parce qu’il était gentil, il était très concentré et surtout ses films m’intéressaient beaucoup. Quand je l’ai rencontré, je ne connaissais qu’un film de lui – que j’avais vu à la télé – c’était Tous les autres s’appellent Ali. Et je ne savais pas que c’était lui qui l’avait fait. Et comme il m’a appréciée, il m’a demandée pour le film suivant: La femme du chef de gare (Bolwieser). C’était d’abord un film produit pour la télé et on a fait après une version pour le cinéma qui était formidable... Sur La femme du chef de gare j’ai fait tout le son. Axelle: le montage son seulement, pas le montage du film? Juliane: Non. J’ai fait le montage de la version cinéma avec Rainer parce qu’il l’a voulu. Ça

a vraiment été une bataille entre lui et Ila von Hasperg qui disait: “je ne veux pas que Juliane le fasse” et j’ai senti que c’était le début de quelque chose entre nous. Comme j’étais très jeune et que je ne savais pas grand-chose, pour lui c’était une chance de me montrer la voie et puis d’un autre côté j’étais prête. Après le mixage de La femme du chef de gare, il m’a dit que le prochain film qu’il faisait c’était Despair, d’après un roman de Nabokov. C’était le premier scénario de Tom Stoppard et le rôle principal c’était Dirk Bogarde. Et c’était un acteur dont je rêvais quand j’étais jeune. C’était le premier film international de Rainer. Il a été sélectionné à Cannes – il n’a pas gagné de prix – , mais pour moi ça a été la chance de travailler sur un film avec un gros budget. Après ce film Rainer m’a dit: «maintenant tu les fais tous.» Il avait demandé à un Anglais, monsieur Reginald Beck, de faire le montage de Despair, mais la connexion ne s’est pas faite entre les deux. Pour lui, la raison d’engager Reginald Beck qui était le monteur de Joseph Losey et de Laurence Olivier – très connu, très sérieux – était qu’il avait monté beaucoup de films où Dirk Bogarde était l’acteur principal. Pour Rainer il était nécessaire que le monteur connaisse et ait une sensibilité pour l’acteur. C’était assez naïf parce que monsieur Beck disait de Bogarde: “il est horrible, il est horrible” (rires) “il va falloir le doubler”. Et il y a eu un problème, le film était très long parce que Rainer avait beaucoup tourné. C’était son premier film à gros budget et il pouvait essayer beaucoup de plans, c’était vraiment formidable, mais le film durait trois heures. Le monteur avait monté tout le matériel qu’il avait reçu. Or, le rêve de Rainer était d’avoir un monteur qui fasse le film et qui lui dise à la fin: «c’est le film.» (rires) «c’est votre film.» Mais Rainer n’avait pas dit à Reginald Beck ce qu’il voulait parce qu’il était timide, c’était vraiment très drôle. Il ne parlait pas beaucoup à ses collaborateurs, seulement sur ce qu’il pensait du film, mais il ne disait pas au monteur: “je veux ça” parce que sa mise en scène était si précise... il fallait monter bien sûr, il y avait beaucoup de matériel, mais il y avait un style qu’il a exploré, il allait très vite, il faisait beaucoup de plans, et pour lui c’était vraiment... il adorait le montage et les monteurs. Et pour lui le monteur était quelqu’un qui devait prendre l’initiative, comme le mot editor en anglais, quelqu’un qui dise: “je te présente ton film.» C’est quelque chose que j’ai appris dès le début et je me suis vraiment formée comme ça: «tu fais le film, je suis le metteur en scène, je fais beaucoup de travail, et comme je fais aussi le scénario c’est assez» – pas toujours, mais souvent il faisait aussi le scénario. Axelle: Il voulait une nouvelle écriture du film par le monteur?

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

49

Les Monteurs

Juliane: Pas une nouvelle écriture, parce qu’on ne peut pas changer un film de Fassbinder. C’est lui qui faisait le film. Donc pour Despair, on a changé la dramaturgie et on a créé un nouveau rythme en une nuit, et après le film durait deux heures et demie. Et les producteurs n’en voulaient pas – en 1977 on disait un film de plus de deux heures ça ne marche pas – et Fassbinder n’était pas encore quelqu’un qui avait le pouvoir de l’imposer. La version de 2h30 c’était la plus magnifique, c’était vraiment très bon, c’était la version qu’on a fait en une nuit. Et après on a changé encore et je sais qu’il n’était pas heureux avec ça, il m’a toujours dit que c’était une erreur de l’avoir fait. Mais qu’est-ce qu’il pouvait faire, c’était son premier film à gros budget et il était dépendant bien sûr. Je me souviens que je progressais, je progressais et j’ai voulu être aussi assistante à la mise en scène. C’était sur un film à petit budget: La Troisième Génération, avec Bulle Ogier et Hanna Schygulla. Rainer écrivait les dialogues le matin ou le soir avant le tournage et Bulle Ogier ne parlait pas bien allemand, alors je devais lui traduire, et je me souviens qu’une fois Bulle m’a dit: «quoi ça veut dire?» (rires) parce que c’était mauvais ce que j’avais traduit. Ça, c’était l’époque Fassbinder. C’était la plus légère, la plus rapide, la plus jolie... Après deux ans de travail ensemble, on était ensemble aussi, on vivait ensemble... C’était fantastique et bien sûr le plus haut sommet en termes de montage et de projet ça a été Berlin Alexanderplatz. L’expérience de Berlin Alexanderplatz. A partir de Berlin Alexanderplatz, Rainer a eu l’idée de ne plus faire qu’une seule prise. Une semaine avant le début il m’a dit: «Ah j’ai oublié de te dire, tu dois présenter chaque jour le montage.» Ça voulait dire que je recevais à midi les rushes de la veille et à cinq heures du soir je devais présenter les séquences montées. Et cela chaque jour pendant neuf mois. Le montage était terminé deux semaines après le tournage de la dernière scène. Et on n’a pas fait beaucoup de post-synchro, c’était du son direct. Il y a eu deux personnages qui ont été doublés entièrement, je ne dirai pas qui parce qu’on ne doit pas le dire (rires). Et à partir de ce film – pour Veronika Voss, Lola ou Lili Marlene – on n’a plus eu qu’une prise, et puis ma présentation de tout le film monté. Il me disait ça m’ennuie, je sais ce que je veux, je le tourne et toi tu le présentes. C’était comme ça. Axelle: Il y avait beaucoup de répétitions? Juliane: Pas du tout. Par exemple pour Berlin Alexanderplatz, au début on pensait que le aotg.com

tournage prendrait 12 mois. Et finalement ça a duré 9 mois. Et le film était prêt. Ça veut dire qu’il était comme une machine, si précis. Ses scénarios étaient toujours très très précis, et il faisait des petits dessins. Le matin, il me demandait: «quelle scène je tourne aujourd’hui?” Quand je présentais le montage, je présentais toujours la scène précédente et la scène suivante si elles étaient prêtes. Pour lui c’était important que toute l’équipe voie le film parfait. C’est vraiment génial. Je me souviens que les trois premiers mois, on a tourné à Berlin – Berlin-Est à cette époque – en décors naturels, ça allait très vite et j’ai pu voir que son estimation de la durée montée de ce qu’il avait tourné était toujours exacte. Une fois il a tourné vingt minutes utiles en une journée. Question: le soir, d’habitude, c’est la projection de rushes pour toute l’équipe, mais là c’était la projection d’un montage. A ce moment-là est-ce qu’il faisait des rectifications? Juliane: non pas du tout. Axelle: à cinq heures il fallait montrer une ou deux séquences montées dans la journée, or les séquences de Berlin Alexanderplatz sont souvent très longues... Juliane: une fois 12 minutes... Quelquefois il y avait des plans-séquences, avec beaucoup de travellings, mais il y avait aussi beaucoup, beaucoup de montage et je me souviens des notes, il en donnait toujours à son assistante: “tu le montes comme je l’ai tourné” (rires). C’était tout. Mais pour moi c’était un training que je n’oublierai jamais. Je n’avais pas le temps d’avoir peur, je réfléchissais une fois et je...Poum! (rire) parce que je n’avais que trois heures pour terminer. Il n’a jamais fait d’heures supplémentaires parce qu’il y avait des règles et puis il voulait voir la télé le soir (rires) ou aller au restaurant ou réfléchir. Tout le monde disait: il est fou, il boit, il se drogue... Il ne se droguait pas à cette période-là, il avait arrêté. Mais c’était vraiment fantastique et pour moi c’était si simple et si normal, j’ai grandi dans ce rythme... Axelle: un peu comme un sportif... à la fois sa façon de travailler, mais aussi la façon dont tu as travaillé. C’est-à-dire tous les jours on voit des rushes, on doit les monter, on ne peut pas ne pas le faire, on doit monter et présenter le soir. Juliane: exactement. Berlin Alexanderplatz est édité en DVD. J’ai réalisé deux documentaires, l’un sur la restauration numérique et l’autre sur la fabrication, le “making of “ de Ber-

twitter

facebook

50

Les Monteurs

lin Alexanderplatz. J’ai essayé un peu d’expliquer comment c’était et j’ai aussi demandé à d’autres collaborateurs. C’était... aujourd’hui on ne peut pas le comprendre. Quand j’ai monté mon dernier grand film: Agnes und seine Brüder (Une famille allemande), le réalisateur était Oskar Roehler, le sujet était d’après un film de Rainer: L’année des 13 lunes; j’ai monté avec un Avid. Et Oskar tournait beaucoup, on avait vraiment des kilomètres de matériel... Alors que Rainer pour un film comme Lola a eu peut-être 12 000 mètres et aujourd’hui on dit que la moyenne pour un film en Allemagne c’est environ 20 000 mètres, c’est beaucoup... Axelle: Fassbinder tournait uniquement ce qu’il voulait, de toute façon en ne tournant qu’une prise c’est sûr qu’on économise... Juliane: Il faisait une prise supplémentaire qu’il ne voulait pas dans les rushes, c’était seulement par sécurité. A cette époque je n’étais pas consciente d’avoir beaucoup de responsabilités. De temps en temps il me disait: “Non cette scène n’est pas bonne” et c’était tout, il ne me disait pas pourquoi et je devais réfléchir à nouveau. C’était tout ce qu’il me disait: “c’est pas bon”, mais ce n’était pas souvent. Au début j’avais vraiment peur parce que l’équipe c’était environ quarante personnes qui étaient dans la salle et je tremblais, c’était horrible chaque jour (rires) chaque jour! Mais à la fin c’était comme faire ses gammes, comme un danseur qui apprend la danse, comme un chanteur. Il y a un travail, on doit le faire et grâce à Fassbinder j’ai eu la chance de faire vraiment un film après l’autre pendant 7 ans avec un metteur en scène qui était bon, ça aide! Ça aide beaucoup. Avec Fassbinder, les modifications après le premier montage Axelle: Est-ce qu’il y avait au montage des changements de structure, est-ce que Fassbinder demandait d’essayer autre chose? Juliane: Bien sûr il était là pour voir, pour réfléchir, mais ça n’était pas: “s’il te plaît une autre prise” parce qu’il n’y avait pas d’autre prise! (rires). Lola c’était un film qui me plaisait beaucoup parce que le sujet était très drôle. Non, il n’y a pas eu de correction pendant Lola. Il y a eu un problème sur Veronika Voss, c’était un problème de scénario pour une séquence seulement. Il n’était pas sûr. Donc une semaine après le tournage il avait pu prendre un peu de distance et il m’a dit: “il y a quelque chose qui n’est pas bien” et il ne savait pas pourquoi. Et il m’a dit: “demande au directeur de la Bavaria, Günter Rohrbach” – qui était auparavant Directeur des programmes de la Westdeutsche Rundfunk (WDR) et en qui il avait confiance – “demande-lui de regarder le film et il pourra peut-être te dire où est ex-

aotg.com

actement le problème de cette scène.” C’était juste une petite scène. Il avait décidé de tourner ce scénario qu’il n’avait pas écrit lui-même, il avait donné l’idée de départ, la première esquisse, mais c’était son équipe, Peter Märthesheimer et Pea Fröhlich qui l’avaient écrit, ça faisait partie de la BRD trilogy [BRD = Bundesrepublik Deutschland – la trilogie allemande comprend: Le mariage de Maria Braun, Lola, Une femme allemande et Le secret de Veronika Voss]. Mais il a changé des dialogues pendant le tournage. Avant le scénario du Mariage de Maria Braun, il y a eu un long synopsis de Rainer, environ 24 pages, dans lequel tous les personnages principaux étaient déjà décrits. Mais le scénario final de Märthesheimer et Fröhlich n’était pas parfait. Le film est différent du scénario, il a changé beaucoup de choses pendant le tournage mais pas pendant le montage. Et Maria Braun c’était avant Alexanderplatz. Pour Maria Braun il y avait beaucoup de rushes et pour moi c’était vraiment quelque chose... Après Despair je me suis dit: “Oh mon Dieu, maintenant je suis monteuse, j’ai une responsabilité.” Mais pour Maria Braun, il a fait beaucoup de plans, et j’ai eu beaucoup de matériel pour le montage. Je n’avais pas d’assistante, je faisais tout moi-même, ça n’était pas numéroté, rien, c’était horrible, horrible vraiment... Il y a eu une scène que je n’ai pas bien montée parce que j’étais inquiète, je n’avais pas d’expérience et il m’a aidée. Je me souviens il m’a appelée après le tournage et il m’a dit: “Alors je te dis ce que je veux: tu commences comme ça, blablabla...” et à la fin il m’a demandé: “tu as compris?” et je n’avais rien compris (rires) c’était vroummm à toute vitesse. Mais je l’ai fait, c’est la scène où elle est en prison avec son mari et elle lui dit: “je suis enceinte” et il avait tourné toute la scène dans chaque axe, avec plein de valeurs de plans. Alors il y avait beaucoup de possibilités, mais j’ai fait une seule erreur et il m’a dit: “non je t’ai dit que cette phrase devait être dans cet axe.” Alors c’est comme ça que j’ai appris, mais pour les changements c’était une semaine ou trois jours, c’était tout. Seulement pour Despair on a tout changé en une nuit. Question: vous n’aviez pas d’assistant? Juliane: si, j’avais une assistante. Axelle: est-ce qu’il y avait une assistante qui faisait le travail de pellicule pendant que tu travaillais à la table de montage en faisant les coupes et en collant, ou simplement en fai-

twitter

facebook

51

Les Monteurs

sant des marques? Juliane: non, je le faisais moi-même... Handarbeit on dit en allemand. Non, je me souviens que Reginald Beck faisait des marques et qu’il voulait voir le résultat vite (rires). J’étais très rapide. Et pour moi la première décision est toujours la meilleure, il y avait bien sûr des rythmes qu’on devait corriger c’est vrai, mais je ne me souviens pas d’avoir fait beaucoup d’essais. C’était vraiment un training pour avoir un rythme. Le rythme de Fassbinder était vraiment spécial, il y avait toujours un plan large, un plan moyen, il aimait beaucoup le plan américain... Chaque scène était toujours composée et il y avait une règle: jamais deux fois le même plan. Sauf peut-être s’il n’y avait pas d’autre matériel, mais il n’aimait pas ça. La musique et le son dans les films de Fassbinder. Question: quel était le rapport de Fassbinder avec la musique, comment travailliez – vous ensemble à la musique du film? Juliane: oui, ça c’est un autre mythe, la musique de Fassbinder. Son compositeur c’était Peer Raben avec qui il avait commencé au théâtre, c’était son premier collaborateur très important. Peer Raben avait une qualité incroyable: parce que Rainer ne disait jamais grand-chose, mais il disait où la musique devait commencer et où elle devait s’arrêter. Et il expliquait exactement ce qu’il voulait, quel thème, le thème du personnage X, le thème de personnage Y, on faisait des marques sur le film, ça commence ici et là c’est fini. Et au final Peer Raben nous apportait une bande et c’était tout.

52

vait peut-être pas.

La seule fois où je me suis moi-même occupée de la musique avec Peer, c’était pour Berlin Alexanderplatz. Rainer n’était pas là – sauf au début pour dire ce qu’il voulait – et je me souviens qu’avant le mixage il voulait écouter les bandes, mais jamais les effets ou les ambiances, seulement la musique. Il aimait être surpris, c’est une qualité vraiment. Et dans la première partie, première bobine il y a eu des choses qu’il n’aimait pas, parce qu’il y avait tout le temps de la musique – il utilisait la musique comme un sujet dramaturgique – alors il m’a dit: “ici on l’enlève et je ne veux que du silence.” Sur Alexanderplatz on a donc changé un peu la musique mais sans Peer Raben.

Et Rainer m’avait dit: “Je ne veux pas toute la musique, seulement deux thèmes” et ça a été horrible parce qu’après sa mort c’était moi qui m’en occupais et bien sûr Peer Raben n’a pas cru que Rainer m’avait dit ça. Et je savais qu’il était très triste. Mais la musique ellemême est très bien. Rainer avait toujours ce projet de faire un opéra avec Peer Raben et ça n’a pas marché.

Et malheureusement Rainer est mort avant le mixage de Querelle, une fois que le tournage était fini mais avant il avait écouté la maquette de la musique car j’avais demandé à Peer Raben de nous donner une cassette. Et Rainer m’avait dit: “Je veux un oratorio pour Querelle, pas une musique de film, un oratorio s’il te plait.” Peer Raben ne l’a pas fait. Il ne pou-

Juliane: c’était la décision de Rainer pendant le mixage. Il fallait toujours entendre un peu les paroles, oui, mais c’est aussi un style qu’il a créé, commencé avec Maria Braun par exemple ou La troisième génération. Je me souviens après la projection de La troisième génération à Cannes, Bernardo Bertolucci lui avait écrit une petite lettre, il lui disait: “je

aotg.com

Axelle: pour Berlin Alexanderplatz, parfois la musique est mixée très fort, on peut avoir du mal à entendre les paroles, elle arrive ponctuellement, très précisément, mais presque gênante, est-ce qu’elle doit être plus entendue que les paroles ou pourquoi?...

twitter

facebook

Les Monteurs

n’avais encore jamais entendu personne – sauf Godard – qui ait vraiment utilisé le son.” Je suis très heureuse d’avoir appris ça grâce à lui sur Maria Braun. Il a eu une idée le jour du tournage de la scène de la fin quand Hanna marche de long en large dans le couloir et qu’elle est troublée parce que Hermann Braun est revenu. Et Rainer a dit: “J’ai besoin de quelque chose d’exceptionnel.” Et comme il s’agissait de la BRD trilogy (trilogie allemande), il a pensé à la finale de la coupe du monde de football en 1954 entre l’Allemagne et la Hongrie que l’Allemagne a gagnée, ce qui voulait dire pour les Allemands: “nous sommes de retour.” Et il a utilisé le commentaire original de l’époque comme une musique dramaturgique – il a eu cette idée le matin du tournage de cette scène. Il y a eu aussi deux autres moments avec des discours d’Adenauer, notre chancelier des années 50 qui a dit que jamais plus l’Allemagne ne devait être en guerre, qu’on n’aurait jamais plus d’armée et trois mois plus tard il disait maintenant on est à l’Otan. Rainer n’avait pas oublié ça et pour lui c’était très important parce qu’il n’était pas seulement metteur en scène, il était aussi quelqu’un qui fait des films politiques et d’une certaine façon aussi historiques, mais il était capable de transformer des informations “authentiques” et de les amener à un autre niveau. Et ce sont des choses que j’ai apprises avec lui. Après Maria Braun, pour Lola, c’était moi qui cherchais tous les sons originaux. Signatures du montage, “final cut”, etc.

toujours doublé, et le montage d’un film comme Tous les autres s’appellent Ali, c’était 10 jours. Pour Le marchand des quatre saisons, le tournage a duré 12 jours, le montage 10 jours. C’était une époque où on n’avait pas d’argent! Et il était très précis à cause de l’économie et du petit budget du film. Pascale: je me souviens d’avoir rencontré la monteuse de Buñuel, elle racontait exactement la même chose, c’était l’école américaine, donc Buñuel n’était pas au montage et elle disait: “j’ai une seconde pour le raccord” et si la personne doit être off, elle n’est tournée que off, parce qu’il ne voulait pas que le film lui échappe... Donc quand j’étais assistante, on était très admiratrices de cette monteuse qui avait travaillé avec Buñuel, elle disait: “mais oui c’est formidable, mais le raccord j’ai pas le choix, c’est plan par plan donc voilà...” Juliane: exact. Pascale: et elle trouvait ça formidable, formidable... Tous avaient une précision d’écriture extraordinaire.

Question: il a fait du montage lui aussi, pour ses anciens films ...

Juliane: c’était comme ça au début. A partir de Despair, il y a eu plus de matériel. Alors c’est pour ça que j’ai eu un peu plus de travail (rires.)

Juliane: oui, oui, il a signé.

Pascale: ça c’était à Hollywood où le producteur avait le final cut.

Question: au générique?

Juliane: Rainer a toujours eu le final cut. Oh, mais c’était la même chose avec un autre metteur en scène... Hitchcock! Hitchcock bien sûr aussi.

Juliane: oui bien sûr, qui faisait le générique sinon lui? C’était un peu parce qu’il aimait ce métier et il avait un pseudonyme, Franz Walsh... Franz, ça a toujours été son deuxième prénom dans son inspiration et Walsh pour Raoul Walsh qu’il admirait. Il a fait lui-même le montage de son premier film parce qu’il n’avait pas l’argent pour une monteuse et le deuxième film c’était une monteuse et qui n’a pas vraiment, comment dire?... elle m’a dit un jour: “tout le monde me dit que je n’ai pas fait le montage, ça ne me gène pas...” Pour ses premiers films il avait vraiment créé exactement plan par plan parce qu’il n’y avait pas d’argent pour tourner plus de matériel. Axelle: il faisait un découpage très précis de ce qu’il voulait pour tourner exactement ce dont il avait besoin... Juliane: oui, mais après le deuxième ou le troisième film, il y a eu une monteuse. C’était aotg.com

Et une autre raison pour laquelle Rainer était très précis c’est que pour lui son scénario c’est la base, une base pour l’équipe et il doit être très précis. Par exemple il avait enregistré le scénario d’Alexanderplatz sur une cassette, c’est une révélation d’écouter ces cassettes. Il dit vraiment: “plan 1, 2, 3” les numéros exacts, “la caméra est là, elle fait un travelling” tout est exact. Pour lui c’était nécessaire, autrement il n’aurait pas pu aller si vite. Et il lui fallait aller vite parce qu’il pensait très vite et il ne voulait pas perdre de temps, c’est tout. Il y a une scène dans Alexanderplatz, je m’en souviens c’est dans la première partie quand Biberkopf [Günter Lamprecht] rencontre Lina [Elisabeth Trissenaar] dans le bar. C’était une grande scène, deux jours de tournage avec des travellings etc., et j’en ai fait un montage très correct – si on peut dire – et il m’a dit que ça n’allait pas... Pour moi ce qu’il faisait était twitter

facebook

53

Les Monteurs

toujours bon, mais lui-même pouvait se critiquer et il m’a dit: “Non c’est pas bon, je n’ai pas fait une bonne scène...” Axelle: je n’ai pas fait une bonne mise en scène... Juliane: ... et on a coupé environ 7 à 10 min. C’est ce qu’il voulait et je me suis laissée guider. Quand je lui ai présenté le montage de cette scène il m’a dit tout de suite: “Ah ça on va le revoir en salle de montage” et en deux heures on a changé. Alors, le Franz était toujours là, c’est moi qui voulais avoir le Franz dans le générique... En 1978, j’ai fait un stage pour améliorer mon français et quand je suis revenue pour faire L’Année des 13 lunes, c’était si parfait, tout était parfait, il m’a dit: “C’est moi qui fais le montage”, j’ai dit: “Oh bien sûr, tu fais le montage...” Et en même temps – il était un très bon acteur de théâtre – il jouait Iago dans Othello. Alors le matin il répétait Iago (rire) et l’après-midi il voulait commencer à monter lui même! Et je me souviens que le premier jour où on a commencé à monter il s’est assis à la table, il a fait UNE coupe et après il m’a regardée: “Ah, je reviens...” et il est parti et il n’est jamais revenu! Et 6 jours après j’avais fini. C’est ça les mecs! Renouveau du cinéma allemand, postérité de RW Fassbinder. Juliane: Alors il y a quelque chose que je voudrais dire comme dernier mot: je sais que j’ai grandi à un moment qui était vraiment une grande époque du cinéma en Allemagne. En France, ça a commencé dans les années 30 jusqu’à la Nouvelle Vague bien sûr et même après. Est-ce qu’il y a eu une mauvaise période pour le cinéma en France? Je ne pense pas. Des voix: ici... c’est toujours la crise... Juliane: toujours la crise! Ok, mais le cinéma français a toujours été intéressant pour nous, il y a toujours un style... A l’époque où Monsieur Kohl était notre chancelier, tous les films étaient joyeux, joyeux, parce que tout le monde pensait que la période des cinéastes comme Fassbinder c’était tellement horrible, réfléchir, parler... Après la mort de Rainer tout a changé. Il n’y avait plus de nouveau cinéma. Quand j’étais en Amérique tout le monde me demandait: “qu’est-ce qui s’est passé avec Fassbinder, où sont les films de Fassbinder?”, il n’y avait plus rien en

aotg.com

Allemagne. Et ça s’est terminé au milieu des années 90 environ, après la réunification, avec les metteurs en scène de l’Est qui ont amené des thèmes incroyables, quelque chose de nouveau, et les metteurs en scènes de l’Ouest on les a oubliés. Mais maintenant il y a un très bon mélange. Tom Tykwer fait toujours des films qui sont très compliqués (rires) un peu comme Wim Wenders, mais il adore Fassbinder, toute sa génération connaît Fassbinder. Pour la mienne, je me souviens, Fassbinder n’était rien. C’était vraiment horrible. C’est pourquoi en 92 j’ai dit: “maintenant il revient! Maintenant il revient!” Et ça a été du travail bien sûr. Et maintenant je suis la méchante (rires) parce que je dois gagner de l’argent avec son œuvre. Je n’ai pas de subventions, je n’en veux pas, c’est une fondation privée, mais j’en demande pour certains projets. Alors, voilà la vie d’un cinéaste qui est mort maintenant depuis 27 ans et son œuvre va... va continuer, oui j’en suis sûre. Mais c’est toujours du travail. Et puis son œuvre est aussi sur scène, au théâtre parce qu’il a écrit environ 20 pièces dont 5 sont très célèbres. Et il y a aussi une nouvelle mode d’adapter les films au théâtre. Le mariage de Maria Braun est un grand succès en ce moment, c’est un jeune metteur en scène très célèbre qui l’a monté pour un grand théâtre à Munich, et ça tourne en ce moment, à Moscou, à St Petersbourg. Ses thèmes sont toujours très actuels. Par exemple un de ses premiers films L’amour est plus fort que la mort est maintenant une pièce de théâtre à Pékin. Monsieur Fassbinder et monsieur Godard sont les grandes vedettes de l’avant-garde en Chine aujourd’hui... fantastique, fantastique! Ca veut dire que le marché va suivre... Et Godard était un des inspirateurs de Fassbinder. Je me souviens qu’il avait vu Vivre sa vie 24 fois! Il adorait Godard. Je ne sais pas s’il l’adorerait aujourd’hui encore. Mais il est encore actuel. L’alchimie du metteur en scène et du monteur, c’est quelque chose de très important. Travailler sur son premier film avec quelqu’un comme Fassbinder c’est vraiment un cadeau. Avec Werner Schroeter aussi, parce que ce sont des gens qui apportent un univers. Il y a beaucoup de metteurs en scène maintenant parce que c’est très chic de faire un film. Et c’est très difficile de collaborer parce que le monteur est toujours le serviteur, d’une certaine manière. Je me souviens d’une phrase du frère de Marcello Mastroianni, le grand Ruggero. Quelqu’un lui avait demandé: “qu’est-ce que c’est que le montage? Pensez-vous que vous êtes important?” et il a répondu: “est-ce que vous connaissez votre sage-femme?” C’est une très belle métaphore.

twitter

facebook

54

Les Monteurs

Quand j’étais à New-York, je voyais souvent Thelma Shoonmaker – la monteuse de Scorcese – qui est quelqu’un de formidable – elle a gagné deux Oscar, avant lui! (rires) – et elle est fantastique. Scorcese est très fort, maniaque bien sûr. Elle m’a invitée une fois, il avait à cette époque une grande salle de montage dans Park Avenue, et elle m’a dit: “c’est très facile avec l’Avid, c’est très facile.” Elle avait 3 ou 4 assistantes et il y avait une salle de projection parce que Scorsese ne voulait pas voir le montage sur l’Avid. Alors elle montait et c’était conformé en pellicule. Elle me disait toujours: “le montage c’est lui, c’est toujours lui”, et c’était elle bien sûr, mais elle ne voulait jamais le dire. Elle travaille avec lui depuis 30 ans... Je n’ai jamais parlé de notre collaboration tant que Rainer était vivant parce que c’était un secret et la salle de montage c’était son secret. Je me souviens que j’ai eu une assistante qu’il n’aimait pas, alors il m’a dit: “out”. J’ai accepté. C’était pour lui. C’était une atmosphère tellement sensible... Werner est différent, pour Werner il n’y a pas de problème. Pour lui le montage c’est... on parle, on fait, on mange ensemble pendant le travail, on reste très longtemps... et à la fin on est dans le lit ensemble, on est une grande famille (rires)... le lit complet. Avec Rainer pour moi, tout était normal, ça n’était pas: “Oh le grand metteur en scène.” Avec Werner il y a eu des moments où on était très proches et il était aussi très proche de son film, mais Rainer était plus présent dans ses films et Werner était toujours dans son... trip personnel, oui...

55

Après la mort de Rainer, je ne pouvais pas travailler avec quelqu’un d’autre. Je pleurais toujours et le premier avec lequel j’ai travaillé, il était horrible bien sûr (rires), il ne savait rien de moi et il me disait: “tu veux travailler avec Fassbinder, mais c’est fini...” C’était horrible, il était jaloux bien sûr. Il n’a fait qu’un film et je savais qu’il n’était pas bon. Mais qu’est-ce qu’on peut dire, qu’est-ce qu’on peut faire, on travaille avec ce qu’on a, on ne peut pas dire: “tu es mauvais.” J’ai choisi moi-même d’arrêter, je savais que j’étais obsédée, que j’aimais beaucoup les films, que j’étais toujours dans une salle noire et que le soleil brillait! Aujourd’hui avec l’Avid ce n’est plus dans une salle noire... Alors voilà, il n’y a plus de secrets.

aotg.com

twitter

facebook

Assembly

Credits Aotg.com Team Founder & Editor Lead Developer & Layout Editorial & Marketing Director Aotg.com Lead Developer Director of Advertising .pdf Layout and Design

Gordon Burkell Chris Kim Victoria Basova Richard Munro Michael Valinsky Yevgeniya Osypova

Aotg.com Content Authors

Interviewees

Interviewers

Images By

Gordon Burkell Jonny Elwyn Norman Hollyn Bobbie O’Steen Michael Kahn James Rosen Geoffrey Leondardelli Michael Horton (LACPUG) Daniel Bérubé (BOSCPUG) Wendy Woodhall (LAPPG) Kevin Monahan (SFCutters) Gordon Burkell Bobbie O’Steen Jonny Elwyn Bobbie O’Steen(Michael Kahn Talk images) Movie Stills Database Ratch/Shutterstock Andrey_Popov/Shutterstock Andrey_Kuzmin/Shutterstock Alejandro Dans Neergaard/Shutterstock Kuco/Shutterstock

ACE Content ACE Cannes Highlights Text & Images

Eric Kench

Rhythm and Our Lives Written by Images by

Edgar Burcksen, ACE Rob Stark/Shutterstock Igor Bulgarin/Shutterstock

ASE Content Mrs. Biggs Written by Images by

Cindy Clarkson December Media

The Hidden Universe Written by Images by

Cindy Clarkson December Media Waynes family

˄ 56

˅

Assembly

Les Monteurs Content

CCE Content Inside Hemlock Grove Written by Images by

Recontre Autour Du Film: Entre Les Murs Parker Mott Environics Communications

Interviewer Interviewees

Pascale Chavance Laurent Cantet Robin Campillo

Interviewer Interviewees

Pascale Chavance Juliane Lorenz

Interview with Juliane Lorenz

˄ 57

˅

Thank You! Art of the Guillotine Inc. would like to thank the American Cinema Editors, Australian Screen Editors, Canadian Cinema Editors, and Les Monteurs Associés, and Norman Hollyn, Bobbie O’Steen, Cindy Clarkson, Jonny Elwyn, Parker Mott, Eric Kench, Edgar Burcksen, ACE, Michael Kahn, ACE, The Aotg.com Staff, and all the photographers, coders, advertisers, writers, and artists involved. All inquiries please contact [email protected]

aotg.com

twitter

facebook